THE BLOG
03/18/2010 05:12 am ET | Updated Nov 17, 2011

Mixing Religions during the Holiday Season: A Tale Of Guilt and Gelt

According to a new poll taken by the Pew Forum, Americans are mixing faiths more than ever before. Many attend worship services of more than one denomination, and many also blend Christianity with Eastern or New Age beliefs, such as reincarnation and astrology. This follows on an earlier survey showing that Americans also change religion in adulthood with increasing regularity.

To which I say: Guilty as charged.

We celebrate Hanukkah in our household and Christmas at my Mother's. Yesterday, I went to a Hanukkah party and sang along (semi-credibly) as the candles were lit. Next weekend, I'll be singing Christmas carols in Belsize Square.

I've tried to resist this whole wishy-washy, neither-fish-nor-fowl approach to religion (and we all know what Jesus would prefer). Like Kristen over on Motherese, I'm also a once-religious Catholic now married to a Jew. I, too, feel badly as I confront the inevitable December Dilemma which plagues all couples choosing a religious path for their mixed families. I worry that my kids aren't getting the sort of firm anchoring in tradition, identity and beliefs that I had growing up.

But despite all the guilt and accompanying feelings that I *should* "figure out religion" or join a synagogue, somehow those never quite manage to make their way up the ladder of my to-do list.

And so, in the spirit of "eliminating the shoulds," this year I'm trying to accept that for now - at least - I'm a sampler of religions, not a practitioner. I am, in fact, that dreaded "consumer of religion" which one religious studies scholar bemoaned in the Wall Street Journal. And I'm trying to embrace my dabbling tendencies where religion is concerned, and enjoy them, rather than feeling guilty.

After all, my kids seem totally comfortable with their faux-Jewish identities. They have no concept of the fact that because I'm not Jewish, they really aren't either. They are proud to call themselves Jews, and to celebrate Christmas in a sort of ad-hoc way. As for me, for the first time in many years, I find myself actually wanting to go listen to some religious Christian music this holiday season (something I was dragged to on many an occasion in my youth.) So when I saw a sign at the local (Anglican) parish for a Festival of Lessons and Carols, I thought: Why not?

So guilt, shmilt.

And speaking of which, my favorite holiday story this season comes from a (non-Jewish) friend of mine whose 4 year-old daughter was so eager to celebrate Hanukkah that she instructed her mother to rush out and buy some "guilt." (She meant gelt.) To which my friend was tempted to reply, "Oh, honey, I think we have enough guilt in the house already...don't you?"

And how.

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