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Too Many Options? Four Questions Every Multi-Passionate Entrepreneur Should Ask Themselves

02/03/2015 06:12 pm ET | Updated Apr 05, 2015

Many entrepreneurs are overwhelmed by their own vast reserves on talent and abilities and the freedom to choose what to build their businesses around. Too many options are apparently the kryptonite of the multi-passionate entrepreneur, because life really can be tough when you have so many choices. There are four questions every multi-passionate entrepreneur should ask themselves.

Increasing numbers of entrepreneurs are finally beginning to see themselves as the business executives that they are and need to be to run their business. As more entrepreneurs find their way to me, I have noticed one way in which they differ from my usual professional and executive clients; many entrepreneurs are overwhelmed by their own vast reserves on talent and abilities and the freedom to choose what to build their businesses around. Too many options are apparently the kryptonite of the multi-passionate entrepreneur, because life really can be tough when you have so many choices.

"It doesn't matter what I do, I know I can make it work. So how do I choose what I really should do?" This was the opening sentence during a recent client interview. The choice of words caught my attention. "Should" is an interesting word. It appeared that "too many options" was the problem to resolve. One might think that being extremely smart, financially secure and with much more natural talent and ability than most people would solve most, if not all, of a person's problems. Here was someone clearly in pain over that very situation.

As I listened intently to this brilliant woman talk, not only did I hear the long list of accomplishments and business successes, I also heard the undercurrent of longing to embrace her purpose and do something that would fulfill and reward her with more than just financial success.

As she spoke, a familiar pattern revealed itself, one common with people who win some kind of biological lottery and come into the world apparently equipped to succeed at seemingly anything. For as long as she could remember, this woman had made decisions based on a single question, "Can I do this?" Given her intellect, talent and skills, the answer has always been a resounding "of course." But she hasn't been asking the right questions.

The four questions that every multi-passionate entrepreneur must ask herself or himself are, "Do I want to do this?", "Why do I want to do this?", "Is this aligned with my core values ?" and "Can I still choose to do this in 5 Years." These three questions can be tremendously helpful, if you find yourself sinking in a sea of options and hard choices and repeatedly choosing what you can or what you should do over what you really want to do.

Here's how to let these three questions guide you in what you pursue in your business or even what business to create:

Do I want to do this?

Clear your head, before you ask yourself, "Do I want to do this?" Even a 5- to 10-minute breathing and meditation exercise in a quiet space can be all you need to stop the mind chatter and allow you to envision what saying "yes" or "no" to this question will do for you. Try to focus only on do you want to do this, simply assume that everything is possible and leave the why and the how out of the decision for now. Listen to your intuition.

Why do I want to do this?

Once you have made a decision to do something, whether it is changing your market, adding a new service line or creating a new business altogether, get clear on why you want to do it. By diving deep on your motivation for making a particular choice, you also create the basis for actually evaluating how you can make this decision work in your favor. For example, if you want to create a business that allows you to use your skills as a technical designer, your expertise as a singer, your knowledge from your degree in human anatomy and physiology and your passion for Nickelback, then you may explore patenting a new type of performance enhancing microphone for rock musicians. Cheers to the multi-passionate entrepreneur in you!

Is this aligned with my core values and what matters most to me?

One of the most important questions to ask yourself in any endeavor is whether it is aligned with your core values and what matters most to you in life. You already know that anything is possible, so be aware that everything has a price. In the words of Henry David Thoreau, "the price of anything is the amount of life you exchange to get it".

You want to be sure that the choices you make in your business support the non-negotiable values in your life. If one of your core values is your family and make a business decision takes you away from your family five days and nights per week, chances are that no matter how successful the endeavor is at the business level, you will be very unhappy with that choice. That unhappiness will eventually negatively impact your business, the same one you sacrificed your core values to.

Can I still choose to do this in 5 Years?

Sometimes you want to say "yes" to all that life has to offer and the problem is simply that you have not yet figured out how to clone yourself so that you can simultaneously be in multiple space dimensions. In this case, when all options are equally "yes", prioritize and ask yourself, which one must be acted upon now or it will no longer be an option. Choose what calls to you most right now. In the words of T.D. Jakes, "throw your whole self at it" and know that you are free to change your mind and move on to your next passion whenever you are ready.

Remember, life is a journey, not a destination. And you are amazing! (Thank you, Aerosmith.)

Denise Banks-Grasedyck is a certified Coach, Consultant and Speaker. She helps professionals, executives and entrepreneurs around the world achieve their most meaningful goals with less stress, better results and more fulfillment.
Contact Denise at: http://www.banks-grasedyck.com/contact/