Huffpost Gay Voices
The Blog

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors

Diana Scholl Headshot
Laurel Golio Headshot

Sharing the Stories of LGBT Youth: Dohyun, 19, From Atlanta (PHOTO)

Posted: Updated:
Print Article

We Are the Youth is a photographic journalism project chronicling the individual stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth in the United States. Through photographic portraits and "as told to" interviews in the participants' own voices, We Are the Youth captures the incredible diversity and uniqueness among the LGBT youth population. We Are the Youth addresses the lack of visibility of LGBT young people by providing a space to share stories in an honest and respectful way. Below is the story of Dohyun.

Dohyun's story is part of a series of profiles from the Southern United States from 2010. We Are the Youth is expanding its reach and currently fundraising through a Kickstarter campaign to expand We Are the Youth to the Midwest.

* * * * *

By Dohyun, as told to Diana Scholl

2012-09-04-Dohyun.jpg

When we moved to America, I tried to become more American. I was born in Korea, and we moved to Marietta when I was 10. I have tried to get more into my Korean heritage recently. I'm trying to learn the history and where my family comes from and that sort of thing. I don't speak Korean very well. I speak barely enough to get through to my parents.

I come from a very, very traditionalist, conservative Korean family. Growing up, I never knew what "gay" was. The concept was entirely foreign to me. I actually haven't come out to most of my family. I'm pretty sure if my dad found out, he'd kick me out. My siblings know, I think, but we never talk about it.

I accidentally told my mom during my junior year of high school. I was thinking about it for a while. Then my mom and I were sitting in a room, and she's like, "Do you have something to tell me?" She said it was a phase and it would pass. A lot of tears were shed, by me. I don't think she cried. We've never talked about it since.

Being at college, away from my parents, is a lot more liberating. It gets a lot more difficult as I get more active in the community.

Ever since I've come out, I've been very proud of who I am. My first kiss with a guy was the summer after I came out, the summer between sophomore and junior year. A guy who's now a really good friend of mine. We went out for a week. He didn't think gay rights was really a thing. I helped him come out of the closet and become more active.

I want to do things for the community. I founded the gay-straight alliance in my high school. There were a few other gay kids. Our GSA was more straight allies than queers, which was interesting.

It's different here. I got to Emory and realized there's so much I can do for the community. I really wanted to get my voice out there. There are more gays than I've ever met here. It's refreshing. I never knew there were so many out and proud, active kids around. But still you don't really see a gay couple holding hands.

I don't particularly hang out with Korean kids at Emory. They keep to themselves and speak Korean. Also, Asian culture is very homophobic. I don't know many gay Asians. There's one person who comes to the Queer Students of Color group on campus, but that's it.

I definitely want to come out to my parents, but I want to wait until I get a better foothold and can support myself. I've mentally dealt with it and made peace with how it is with my parents. But sometimes it's hard. My home life feels like it's a lie.

To learn more, check out We Are the Youth's Kickstarter campaign.

Photo by Laurel Golio, taken at Emory University, Atlanta, 2010.