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Mining the Audio Motherlode, Volume 182 -- Great Free Music Online

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Originally posted at WFMU's Beware of the Blog.

Miner3Give the Drummer Some's
Favorite Downloads from the MP3 Blogosphere

Who is Hervé Lemaire (LinkedIN / Wikipedia / Twitter) and why does he hate music? Though some Internet chatter speculates that there is no such person, someone with this name has been operating as an anti-piracy mercenary via LeakID, apparently since 2007.

During the past several weeks, numerous blogs across the Internet have had their accounts suspended at file storage site Mediafire due to a mass mailing of copyright complaints filed by Lemaire. Clearly something nefarious is afoot because many affected blogs have posted exclusively out-of-print recordings, and others had merely been sharing their own recordings. It's not clear yet if Lemaire has deployed some sort of automated DCMA-bot intent on maximzing blogosphere entropy, but his ability to wreak widespread havoc is clearly thanks to Mediafire, which is suspending accounts purely on the basis of unproven accusations of copyright infringement.

You can follow a running discussion about this ongoing controversy here in the comments to a post at the iamtheleastmachiavellian.

    
BaoOrchestre du Bawobab ~ Visages du Senegaal
(Blog: Blue Beat in My Soul)

Specialist in All Styles
"Amongst certain circles of Afro-funk fans, 'Kelen Ati Len' is probably the best-known song by this Dakar band but this LP is hardly a one-tracker. No doubt, 'Kelen Ati Len' is killer with its crashing drums and angular guitar work. It's like Bawobab/Baobab members had spent a few years jamming with the Kashmere Stage Band before returning to Senegal."  (Descriptions by O-Dub, at Soul-Sides)



SunilSunil Ganguly ~ Swinging Hits
(Blog: Washerman's Dog)

Boogie-Woogie String Along for Real
"From the opening glassy tingles of Om Shanti Om, ace Indian electric guitarist, Sunil Ganguly, lets his listeners know that he has come for one thing only. To swing. The course was pretty much predetermined by the record label: Bollywood hits only thank you. Nothing adventurous, please, we are the Titans of Indian Industry. Within that straight jacket however, Sri Ganguly from Tripura and latterly, Calcutta, manages to demonstrate his skills as guitarist and arranger.  His tone is always crystal clear and his fingers never fearful of pushing out the vibrato so vital to Hawaiian electric guitar.  With the tabla he mixes gentle string quartets and on the more up-tempo numbers, like the opener, tosses in electric organ and horns to make everything as cool as a plate of faluda on a July's morning. On Hari Om Hari Sunil seems to be truly playing from outerspace with all sorts of weird mechanical squeals bubbling through the ether."  (Description by ajnabi, at Washerman's Dog)

 

DavyDavy Graham ~ Folk, Blues & Beyond
(Blog: The Red Hippie)

Cracking Good Graham
"As the album title states, this album is a mesh of folk, blues and jazz sounds, meshed by the genius playing of Davy Graham, establishing the sounds of the new musical generation, the folk revival, who would be 'officially' brought into existence next year, 1965 (with the releases of Bert Jansch's and John Renbourn's Debut Albums). Graham would pick-up the best folk material available and reinterpret it all, with his unique Middle Eastern approach to his instrument (the famous DADGAD guitar tuning). Leadbelly, Bob Dylan, Willie Dixon and Reverend Gary Davis all were covered. This second album by Graham is now seen as folk's seminal recording, which has even influenced the likes of Jimmy Page."  (Description by the Red Hippie Teenager, at in the liner notes )

 

SouthSouth Side Movement ~ South Side Movement
(Blog: Funkytownsoul)

No Cubs Fans Here
"I've Been Watchin' You' is THE killer track and a heavily sampled motha....Surely one of the first songs detailing the finer intricacies of 'the stalker', its semi-sparce arrangement, tight funk approach, and slightly strained vocals are pretty much symbolic of the LP. Absolutely essential to any off-the-bone prime rump motion, attaining Top 20 placement in the Billboard Soul charts. Then it's some horny horns on the short but groovy 'Love Turn Me Loose' - I'll never look the same way at the offer of a hot beverage again after hearing this 'un ! 'La Dee Da' is one of the more melodic tracks on display, resplendent with busy backing vocs, vibes and a colorful arrangement - a nice change of pace. Things get a little more urgent for 'Have a Little Mercy.' Dag namit, call the fire brigade coz this baby's tail feather is on fire -- faultless funk at its most insidious -- my pick for sure. Then we get some drag-funk in 'Can You Get to That' with Melvin sounding slightly spacey. I definitely got to that." (Description by Trakbuv at Funk My Soul, which originally shared this record in '09.)

[Like this? You can get the groups second and third albums, too.]

 

TrioTrio Nordestino  ~  Os Grandes do Sucessos
(Blog: Forró em Vinil)

Good Things Come in Threes
"One of the highest expressions of our popular music is undoubtedly the Northeast Trio. Their recordings, always constituted success in the components and the Trio have been an ideal vehicle of our popular music, the interpretation feature that you lend, marking definitely the excellent condition of our repertoire regional farmers, which puts them among the phonography national greats in that genre. Reliving the major previous releases, this album which selects twelve of the best and most outstanding interpretations of popular music, a collection of what must be preserved as many of the good things of this world."  (Translation of the liner notes)

 

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