THE BLOG
01/25/2016 10:41 am ET | Updated Jan 25, 2017

Why Living Together Without Marriage Can Increase Your Mental Health

Kari Layland via Getty Images

I've written previously that we're living through a steady, growing shift in our society, as men and women re-think what kinds of relationships they seek and prefer - whether straight or gay. For example, I've written here that part of this shift is towards increasing acceptance of a variety of emotional-sexual experiences of couples; including polyamory; and committed couples who choose not to marry.

Now, some new research adds to these findings, as well as to recent survey data that younger people, especially, are more concerned with building a positive, sustaining relationship than with marriage, per se. The current study, described in this report from Ohio State University, found that both men and women experience as much of a boost in their emotional well-being whether they move in together or marry. It was a bit more for women, but interestingly, that boost occurred equally among men and women who had a prior relationship that didn't work out.

That finding is significant for reasons that might not be visible on the surface: I think it reflects the reality that forming a lasting love relationship with the right partner requires a prior failure or two. Such experiences are like a "leavening" of your inner self. It builds the foundation for learning what kind of person - his or her values, character, outlook on life -- meshes with who you are, along those dimensions. And that increases the likelihood that a couple will grow together, emotionally, sexually, intellectually and spiritually, rather than grow apart.

This new study was based on data collected throughout the 2000s. It found that, for young adults who moved on from a first relationship, both men and women received similar emotional boosts whether they moved in with their second partner or got married to them.

The findings suggest an evolving role of marriage among young people today, said Sara Mernitz, co-author of the study. "Now it appears that young people, especially women, get the same emotional boost from moving in together as they do from going directly to marriage," she said. "There's no additional boost from getting married."

Claire Kamp Dush, co-author of the study, pointed out that "We're finding that marriage isn't necessary to reap the benefits of living together, at least when it comes to emotionalhealth." The study appears online in the Journal of Family Psychology.

dlabier@CenterProgressive.org. Douglas LaBier, Ph.D., writes the blog, Progressive Impact and is director of the Center for Progressive Development. For more about him on The Huffington Post, click here.