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Dr. Jeffrey H. Toney

Dr. Jeffrey H. Toney

Posted: November 22, 2010 07:21 PM
Read More: Divorce , Time , Divorce News

Every fiber in my being says, "Don't do it" but somehow I am compelled to share this. A poem by Pultizer Prize winner James Tate featured recently in The New York Times, curiously as one of "six poems to mark the end of daylight saving time" titled "Free" struck a chord, deeply. Perhaps a new day is dawning, for each of us or maybe it already has.

Free

I was always thinking about her even when I wasn't thinking. Days went by when I did little else. She had left me one night as a complete surprise. I didn't know where she went. I didn't know if she was ever coming back. I searched her dresser and closet for any clues. There wasn't anything there, nothing. No lotions or creams in the bathroom. She had really cleaned out. I thought back on our years together. They seemed happy to me. Summers on the beach, winters in the mountains skiing. What more could she want? We had friends, dinner parties. I walked around thinking, maybe she didn't love me all that time. I felt so alone without her. I hated dinners alone, I hated going to bed without her. I thought she might at least call, so I was never very far from the phone. Weeks went by, months. It was strange how time flew by when you had nothing to remember it by. My friends never mentioned her. Why can't they say something? I thought. I remembered every tiny gesture of her hand, every smile, every grimace. Birthdays, anniversaries -- I never forgot. But then something strange started to happen. I started doubting every memory. Even her face began to fade. The trip to Majorca, was it something I read in a book? The jolly dinner parties, were they a dream? I didn't trust anything any longer. I searched the house for any trace of her. Nothing. I started asking my friends if they remembered anything about her. They looked at me as if I were crazy. I sat at home and began to cheer up. What if none of this happened? I thought. What if there was nothing to be sad about?

-- JAMES TATE, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author, most recently, of "The Ghost Soldiers"

 

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