Fidel Castro As 'World Hero Of Solidarity'

Today, 70 countries from around the world benefit from Cuba’s medical internationalism.

11/28/2016 11:25 am ET | Updated Nov 28, 2016

The world is now mourning the passing of Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro Ruz, the only individual ever to be acknowledged by the UN as a “World Hero of Solidarity.” It is very hard to think of a more important world leader than Fidel. The contribution he has made to the Third World liberation struggle and to social justice has been monumental - especially when one considers that he has been the leader of a tiny country with roughly the same population as New York City.

For example, at Fidel’s initiation, Cuba has been hosting the peace talks between the Colombian government and left-wing FARC guerillas for several years. The Colombian government and the FARC are now on the brink of ending the 52-year civil war which has been ravaging their country, in no small measure due to Fidel’s leadership.

As Nelson Mandela himself proudly acknowledged, South Africa is free from apartheid due in large part to Fidel’s leadership in militarily aiding the liberation struggles in Southern Africa, especially in Angola and Namibia, against the South African military whose efforts the United States, a long-time friend of apartheid, supported.

In addition, The Latin American Medical School (ELAM) in Cuba, which trains doctors from all around the world, but particularly from poor countries, was Fidel’s brainchild. Today, 70 countries from around the world benefit from Cuba’s medical internationalism, including Haiti where Cuban doctors have been, according to The New York Times, at the forefront of the fight against cholera. As The New York Times has also explained, Cuba has also been a bulwark against the Ebola epidemic in Africa:

Cuba is an impoverished island that remains largely cut off from the world and lies about 4,500 miles from the West African nations where Ebola is spreading at an alarming rate. Yet, having pledged to deploy hundreds of medical professionals to the front lines of the pandemic, Cuba stands to play the most robust role among the nations seeking to contain the virus.

As we speak, Cuba has hundreds of doctors working in the slums of Caracas, Venezuela where Venezuelan doctors fear to tread. There are Cuban-trained doctors in remote parts of Honduras which are otherwise not served by the Honduran government. Patients from 26 Latin American and Caribbean countries have traveled to Cuba to have their eyesight restored by Cuban doctors. Among this list is Mario Teran, the Bolivian soldier who shot and killed Che Guevara. The Cubans not only forgave Mario, but also returned his eyesight to him. Cuba even offered to send 1,500 doctors to minister to the victims of the Hurricane Katrina, though this kind offer was rejected by the United States

As Piero Gleijeses, a professor at John Hopkins University, wrote in his book Conflicting Missions about Cuba’s outreach to Algeria shortly after the Cuban Revolution:

It was an unusual gesture: an underdeveloped country tendering free aid to another in even more dire straits. It was offered at a time when the exodus of doctors from Cuba following the revolution had forced the government to stretch its resources while launching its domestic programs to increase mass access to health care. ‘It was like a beggar offering his help, but we knew the Algerian people needed it even more than we did and that they deserved it,’ [Cuban Minister of Public Health] Machado Ventura remarked. It was an act of solidarity that brought no tangible benefit and came at real material cost.

These words are just as true today as they were then, as this act of solidarity is repeated by Cuba over and over again throughout the world. And, it has been done even as Cuba has struggled to survive in the face of a 55-year embargo by the United States which has cost it billions of dollars in potential revenue, and even as it has endured numerous acts of terrorism by the United States and U.S.-supported mercenaries over the years.

Just recently, I was reminded of the fact that, for the past 25 years, Cuba has been giving free medical treatment at its Tarara international medical center in Havana to thousands of children affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Cuba has continued to do so, it must be emphasized, though even the potential for any help for this effort from the Soviet Union passed long ago.

According to Hugo Chavez, when he came to power in Venezuela in 1999, “the only light on the house at that time was Cuba,” meaning that Cuba was the only country in the region free of U.S. imperial domination. Thanks to the perseverance of Fidel and the Cuban people, now much of Latin America has been freed from the bonds of the U.S. Empire.

That Cuba not only stands 25 years after the collapse of the USSR, but indeed prospers and remains as a beacon to other countries, is a testament to Fidel’s revolutionary fervor and fortitude. Indeed, the very fact that Fidel lived until the ripe age of 90, and died peacefully, was a triumph in itself, given the U.S.’s unrelenting attempts to assassinate him.

And, even as the U.S. media will attempt in the upcoming days to tear down the memory of Fidel’s accomplishments and to assassinate his character, the vast majority of the world will remember Fidel Castro as a hero who fought well above his weight class for social justice.

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