THE BLOG
10/13/2010 01:08 pm ET | Updated May 25, 2011

Time 's Halperin Claims Chamber of Commerce Story's too "Convoluted." Like Whitewater Wasn't?

Last week, ThinkProgress made news by reporting that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, committed to spending tens of millions of dollars blanketing television markets with partisan, anti-Democratic ads this year, "funds its political attack campaign out of its general account, which solicits foreign funding." In other words, donations gathered from around the world from foreign corporations are perhaps being used by the lobbying behemoth to influence elections in America and specifically, to defeat as many Democrats as possible.

That's big news. Period.

But note how Time's Mark Halperin, speaking on behalf of "elites," moved this week to quickly dismiss the Chamber story:

Not only is this issue convoluted and far-fetched, but it also distracts from the issues voters care about, frustrating political insiders and alienating struggling citizens (not that many are following such an offbeat story line).

Read that again. The Time scribe downplayed allegations that the Chamber of Commerce is using foreign funds as part of its 2010 blitzkrieg to take down the Democratic Party in November. I'm still a bit shocked that a journalist would dismiss any news story based on the premise that it's "convoluted and far-fetched."

I'm pretty sure Iran-Contra at first seemed "convoluted and far-fetched." And so did Watergate and so did the Valerie Plame story and so did dozens of other big, juicy news Beltway stories over the years. (And even modestly juicy ones, which the Chamber story might qualify as.) Instead Halperin, playing news editor, waves journalists off the Chamber story because it's "convoluted and far-fetched." Oh, and because voters aren't following the "offbeat" story.

And could that be because journalists like Halperin are not covering it?

Note that Halperin spent more time in his Time piece mocking the story than actually explaining the details of the unsettling allegations. Note that the fact the U.S. Chamber of Commerce will spend tens of millions of dollars this election year airingtens of thousands of attack ads that are often riddled with inaccuracies is of little concern or interest to a media player like Halperin.

His only take on the story was to belittle Obama for talking about it. The Chamber is spending more money than God trying to defeat Democrats, and some of that money might be coming from foreign sources (it's impossible to tell for certain since the Chamber won't disclose its donor list), but for Halperin, the only take-away is that Obama looks small for defending Democrats against the Chamber's tidal wave of attacks.

Oh brother.

And here's the kicker: Halperin is part of the same Beltway press corps that during the Clinton years chased every conceivable harebrained conspiracy theory dreamt up by the Clintons' right-wing haters. During the '90s, the press preferred it when the Clinton gotcha stories were "convoluted and far-fetched." That only added to the intrigue and drama.

Read the full Media Matters column, here.