THE BLOG
04/08/2014 09:16 am ET Updated Jun 08, 2014

If You Need a Reason to Visit London This Spring, Take a Peek at These Parks

Oli Scarff via Getty Images

London is a pretty magical destination year-round -- the bustling streets, the royal residences, the magnificent museums -- but it's an especially wonderful place to visit during the spring as the city bursts into bloom.

Some of the most spectacular spots to experience London's springtime in all its glory are the parks that make England's capital one of the world's most visited cities. Here's a peek.

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    I've been lucky enough to live just blocks from Regent's Park and waste away more than a few afternoons studying, walking and napping on the green grass. The park spans nearly 400 acres and includes Primrose Hill, which features one of the best views in London, and the London Zoo.
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    A one-time royal hunting ground, sprawling Hyde Park is today a bustling open space with its winding Serpentine lake, famous Speakers' Corner and plenty of places to stop and smell the roses (literally).
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    Contiguous to Hyde Park, Kensington Gardens' most famous attraction is Kensington Palace, now home to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. (This photo was taken outside their apartment.) Be sure to find the Peter Pan statue, a gift from author J.M. Barrie.
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    Both an upscale neighborhood and a pleasant park, Holland Park covers more than 55 acres. Step temporarily out of England and into Japan in the serene Kyoto Garden; there is also open-air theatre and the remains of Holland House, badly bombed during the Blitz.
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    So you want to see a royal? St. James's Park is the place to go for the Changing the Guard and Trooping the Colour; see if there will be a royal procession down the Mall while you're in London. Pelicans also call the park home so be on the lookout.
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    It's the photo op you can't leave London without: standing on the Prime Meridian Line in Greenwich Park. Much of the park's landscape was commissioned in the 1660s by Charles II.
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    You may be tempted to move to London immediately upon setting foot in Hampstead Heath, an urban oasis with nearly 800 acres of woodland, open-air swimming and a simply stunning panoramic view of London from Parliament Hill.

Did I miss your favorite park? Tell me about it!

A version of this post first appeared on erinruberry.com