THE BLOG

Data Today, Better Tomorrow

05/01/2015 05:24 pm ET | Updated May 01, 2016

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Some of us are suckers for studies: clinical trials, focus groups, surveys -- whatever promises to shed a little light on the human condition, or possibly make that condition a little better.

This writer is a hopeless volunteer.

I have had my knees examined by MRIs, perhaps studying why I still have the originals despite a long history of abuse. I have had blood drawn for a study of celiac disease by someone who came to the house as part of the deal but unfortunately was not trained to find veins without causing excruciating pain. I have filled out lengthy surveys about addictive behavior -- which may include addiction to study-participation (though that was not among the category choices.)

Currently, I am proudest of being an original part of the Women's Health Initiative, which launched in 1993 with more than 160,000 postmenopausal women including this writer. In 1993 this was a Very Big Deal: studies had been made for all sorts of things with all sorts of participants, but finally there was a study of WOMEN. It sought to discover links between cancer (Imagine! Studying women and cancer!) medical protocols, diet and other factors. Being a congenital wimp, and knowing I wouldn't change my diet or stick to other proscribed regimens, I just signed up for the control group... but still. Even we control groupies are useful.

Over the years, WHI has developed a huge amount of useful data, probably the most beneficial being the finding that (imagine! Studying women!) hormone replacement therapy was not the be-all and end-all we had originally thought, but actually not such a good idea. (Read all about it.)

WHI has published over a thousand articles, approved well over 300 ancillary studies, and twice conducted extension studies. Findings have been about links between age, daily activities, diet etc and things like body fat, omega oils, heart disease, endometrial cancer -- there is a list of useful discoveries resulting from this one large and ever-growing study project that boggles the mind.

Some -- though surely not all -- of this data is collected through regular survey forms received every year by WHI participants in addition to the annual birthday cards that by now this writer accepts as a "Congratulations! Are you're still alive?" greeting. They seek data about lifestyles and life changes along with the traditional general health issues -- and sometimes make one wonder what the next findings may be. My personal favorite question was, "When you enter a room full of people, do you often imagine they are talking about you?"

Paranoia after mastectomy? Who knows.

It is fascinating to be on the questioning end of tomorrow's answers. Next blog: The Brain Health Registry. Assuming my closely-watched brain is still functioning.