THE BLOG
03/18/2010 05:12 am ET | Updated May 25, 2011

A Response to Joe Klein

The able reporter Joe Klein deserves a response to his critique of my objection to President Obama's decision to send another 30,000 troops to Afghanistan. With the 21,000 the President ordered there earlier, plus the 50,000 sent by President Bush, we now have over 100,000 troops assigned to Afghanistan and another 50,000 mercenaries.

I had stated that our growing Afghan involvement reminds me of the Vietnam tragedy. Mr. Klein contends "Afghanistan is different." I agree that there are differences between the two situations, but there are worrisome similarities.

In each case we have assumed that the complicated political, ideological, ethnic and nationalistic cross purposes can be straightened out by American troops. It has further been assumed in both Vietnam and Afghanistan that their problems are primarily the responsibility of the US with only token support from other countries.

The people of Afghanistan have occupied a strip of mountainous territory in Central Asia for many centuries. If they are unable to resolve their internal conflicts, how likely is it that even the best soldiers from our distant land can put things aright?

If our country, which we all love, is to become the world's policeman, where will we recruit enough troops? Some of our regular army and reservists have been fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan for nearly a decade -- longer than WWI and WWII combined. There is a limit to what even superb soldiers like ours can withstand. If we are to play the role of a global police force we should all be involved and that means we should restore the draft and pay higher taxes. We can't keep using the same soldiers war after war while borrowing money from the Chinese.

Mr. Klein expresses grave concern about tensions and dangers in Pakistan and India if we were to "abandon the region" by bringing our troops home from Afghanistan.

I am not advocating that we abandon any region of the world (indeed, I have long favored normalization of relations, including trade and travel, with Cuba, as I did with China long before that happened) We have competent, fully staffed embassies in Afghanistan, Pakistan and India to help us keep informed of developments in these countries and to pursue our interests. We also maintain economic aid missions in these countries. We are not abandoning a country simply because we don't have our army there doing battle.

One final point: Even if Mr. Klein were right in calling for us to continue waging war in Afghanistan, we can't afford it. Thanks to the two wars in Iraq and Afghanistan we've built a national debt of 12 trillion dollars. We're also in the middle of a serious recession. Not a good time for another deepening war.