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Arizona's Immigration Law Has Already Harmed America - No Matter What the Supreme Court Decides

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Arizona's controversial immigration law, which requires immigrants to have their paperwork on hand in case a police officer asks for it during a routine traffic stop, represents further hardship for Latinos in America. Just imagine what it would be like if your boss could randomly ask you for your green card or visa at work. This type of legislation hurts both productivity and morale.

Latinos in America are looking for mainstream acceptance, and this legislation could further accelerate this community's identity crisis. In the end, this is a no-win situation. Whatever the Supreme Court decides, the law has already established a precedent of not trusting Latinos. This is an especially sensitive issue when you consider that Latinos already have trouble trusting others, let alone themselves. That lack of trust continues to hold back a large majority of Latinos in business and society.

Let's face it, immigration reform will forever be a sensitive issue. However, it's an especially hot topic now, as more than 50 million Latinos populate America, and white Caucasians quickly become the minority in a growing number of cities across the United States. America is not what it was 10 years ago. In fact, African Americans, Asian Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics made up over a third of the US population in 2010, and their numbers continue to rise. Two of those groups, Asian Pacific Islanders and Hispanics, are growing at approximately 8 times the rate of the white population. And one of those groups, the majority-minority Hispanics, will represent 30% of the U.S. population by 2050. And with this population growth comes increased economic impact. Indeed, Hispanic purchasing power will be an estimated $1.5 trillion as early as 2015. In short, we are becoming an increasingly diverse nation at a faster and faster rate. But American business and government leaders - and Americans in general - remain in denial about the implication of these facts.

Latinos need a voice to consistently represent them in America. Without that authentic Latino voice, America is having a one-sided conversation about these important issues. Until we find that voice, Latinos will continue to be faced with negative press, intensifying the problems that make it difficult for Hispanic youth to pursue the America Dream and Hispanic professionals to advance.

America's growing diversity is being met with tremendous resistance even as it evolves rapidly. It is no longer enough to simply achieve immigration reform. We must use the changing face of America to create the innovative products, services, and business practices that can help this country reclaim its global competitiveness, which has declined over the past three years. America is experiencing a transformation, and all Americans must accept that this change is no longer optional. In fact, it could be a competitive advantage if our leaders stop fighting to stop it at a time when we need to find new ways to grow and prosper.

It's time for our country to educate itself about the authentic portrayal of immigrants in America. This will help us all better understand our own cultural roots and their foundational values. America must reclaim its authentic spirit. We must stop resisting the immigrant mentality that is part of our diverse heritage.

Please watch and listen to this video carefully and share with others. Are you ready to embrace the immigrant perspective? The New American Economy?

Learn more at www.CenterforHispanicLeadership.com or follow us on Twitter @HispanicTalent