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Gregory D. Squires
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Gregory D. Squires is a professor of sociology and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. Currently he is a member of the D.C. Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the Advisory Board of the John Marshall Law School Fair Housing Legal Support Center in Chicago, and the Social Science Advisory Board of the Poverty & Race Research Action Council in Washington, D.C. He has served as a consultant and expert witness for fair housing groups and civil rights organizations around the country, including HUD, the National Fair Housing Alliance, the National Community Reinvestment Coalition and many others. He also served a 3-year term as a member of the Consumer Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Board. He has written for several academic journals and general interest publications, including Social Problems, Social Science Quarterly, Urban Affairs Review, Journal of Urban Affairs, The Nation, The American Prospect, The New York Times and The Washington Post. Prior to joining the faculty at GWU, he taught at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee and served as a research analyst for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Entries by Gregory D. Squires

Fair Housing Policy Matters

(3) Comments | Posted July 2, 2013 | 8:55 AM

A realtor should never be instrumental in introducing into a neighborhood a character of property or occupancy, members of any race or nationality or any individual whose presence will clearly be detrimental to property values in the neighborhood. (National Association of Realtors 1950)

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"REALTORS® shall not deny...

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HUD's Disparate Impact Rule Praised by Fair Housing Advocates: Misunderstood by Critics

(4) Comments | Posted February 24, 2013 | 2:55 PM

On Feb. 8, 2013, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development issued a rule clarifying the circumstances under which certain housing practices may violate the Fair Housing Act (FHA) as a result of a discriminatory effect. Referred to as the disparate impact rule, this directive explains the longstanding prohibition...

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What Does Barack Obama Owe the Black Community?

(166) Comments | Posted January 18, 2013 | 9:48 AM

Having been reelected president, again with an overwhelming black vote, many ask the question: Just what does Obama owe the black community? After all, he won over 90 percent of the black vote compared with just 40 percent of the white vote (and just over 70 percent of the Latino...

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Protecting the Right to Vote: A Timely Proposal About Time

(0) Comments | Posted November 2, 2012 | 12:41 PM

Long lines leading to long waits at polling places discourage many eligible voters from casting a ballot. At a time when voter suppression laws are being proposed in many states and enacted in some, it is reasonable to assume that these long lines are not always accidents or just the...

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Diversity in the 1%: Does It Make a Difference?

(14) Comments | Posted August 2, 2012 | 5:18 PM

Last month Wells Fargo, the nation's largest home mortgage lender and fourth largest bank, agreed to pay at least $175 million to redress blatant discrimination against African American and Hispanic borrowers. The irony is that this settlement -- the second largest in the Justice Department's history -- is...

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Occupy Wall Street: A New Wave of Fair Housing Activism?

(6) Comments | Posted October 12, 2011 | 11:11 AM

Forty years ago Gale Cincotta, affectionately known in the community organizing world as the mother of community reinvestment, led her troops into bank lobbies, effectively shutting them down for the day, held barbeques on the front yards of bank executives, and threatened Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volker that she would...

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White Speculators, Black Area Foreclosures

(66) Comments | Posted September 10, 2011 | 9:40 AM

Foreclosures continue to decimate communities around the nation, with black neighborhoods being the hardest hit. Some pundits and politicians point to federal policies that encouraged homeownership in low- and moderate-income communities, coupled with reckless behavior on the part of greedy homeowners, as the crux of the problem. One example is...

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Contexts: The More Challenging and Troubling Missing Pieces of the Financial Reform Debate

(17) Comments | Posted March 28, 2011 | 4:14 PM

"I made a mistake." ~ Alan Greenspan 2008

Throughout the various policy, scholarly, and media debates over the financial crisis the focus has been on a handful of bad actors. Among the culprits are greedy homeowners, lazy underwriters, asleep-at-the-wheel regulators, irresponsible investors, fraudulent appraisers and credit rating agencies,...

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Mistrust and Betrayal: The Far Deeper Costs of the Foreclosure Crisis

(57) Comments | Posted January 6, 2011 | 2:52 PM

The financial costs of the seemingly endless foreclosure crisis have been widely reported with Credit Suisse estimating that as many as 12 million families will lose their homes before this is all over. The predatory lending that led to the spike in foreclosures, and the robo-signings coupled with the illegal...

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Segregation: The Invisible Elephant in the Foreclosure Debate

(119) Comments | Posted November 1, 2010 | 6:09 PM

The foreclosure mess just will not go away. Neither will incomplete if not misleading explanations for the crisis, or partial if not ineffective policy proposals. More than 10 million families will lose their homes to foreclosure before the housing market "clears" according to Credit Suisse. Meanwhile, as with the...

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Bank Reform Offers Opportunity to Address Insurance Redlining

(1) Comments | Posted July 13, 2010 | 12:59 PM

"Do the kids in the neighborhood play hockey or basketball?"
--Question posed by a major insurance company to a Boston agent

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act which the President will likely soon sign is a direct, if not immediate, response to a financial crisis that...

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Seeds of Change: A Eulogy for ACORN? A Eulogy for Community Organizing?

(9) Comments | Posted June 6, 2010 | 6:08 PM

ACORN may well have been the most effective anti-poverty organization in the nation's history. To paraphrase Sarah Palin, community organizers such as those who have worked for ACORN are kind of like Alaskan governors, but with commitment and staying power. John Atlas' book, Seeds of Change (Vanderbilt University Press 2010)...

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Cyberdiscrimination in Dallas: Is Neil a More Desirable Tenant than Tyrone or Jorge?

(1) Comments | Posted May 12, 2010 | 4:26 PM

Samantha Friedman and Gregory D. Squires

It helps to be white if you are trying to rent an apartment in Dallas. At least those housing providers who advertise rental units on Craigslist clearly prefer to rent to white rather than African American or Hispanic households.
According to real estate...

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Congress Should Fast Track the Housing Fairness Act

(16) Comments | Posted January 22, 2010 | 4:28 PM

Four million instances of housing discrimination occur each year, yet federal, state, and local fair housing law enforcement agencies processed fewer than 11,000 complaints in 2008, according to the National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA). If the objective of the 1968 federal Fair Housing Act was to replace the ghettos with...

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