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Finding the City Lights in San Francisco

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Although I live in Santa Barbara, California, the one great thing about my course of radiation for my unfortunate bout with breast cancer is that I was able to do my treatments in San Francisco. Yes, this means that I moved to San Francisco for 5 ½ weeks. Sounds like a schlep, I know. But, it was actually a magical Silver Lining of my treatment.

Ahhhhh, San Francisco. It is my new home away from home.

San Francisco feels very soulful and cerebral. It is a nurturing town that cultivates my mind, heart and body. As a breast cancer patient, each of these was exactly what I needed.

One of my most favorite destinations in San Francisco is the City Lights Bookstore. Specifically, the poetry room upstairs.

I am a real sucker for independent bookstores. I pretty much melt in a puddle whenever I have the opportunity to go in one. Much less shop. Ohhhh, I get into real trouble. And City Lights is no exception!

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City Lights is a legendary, landmark independent bookstore and publisher that specializes in world literature, the arts, and progressive politics. It was founded in 1953 by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Peter D. Martin.

There is a legacy of anti-authoritarian politics and insurgent thinking at City Lights, which I love. I also love the way it feels. And smells. I could, in the blink of an eye, lose 3 hours here.

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City Lights is clearly a mecca. I've been in a few times (ok, A LOT of times!) since I arrived to town and on each of my visits, there was a tour of one sort or another. City Lights is an institution. And an (anti) establishment.

If you are in San Francisco, please enjoy this Silver Lining literary meeting place!

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"With this bookstore-publisher combination, it is as if the public were being invited, in person and in books, to participate in that 'great conversation' between authors of all ages, ancient and modern." - Lawrence Ferlinghetti