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Del. Attorney General Beau Biden back in office

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RANDALL CHASE | September 4, 2013 05:07 PM EST | AP

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WILMINGTON, Del. — Vice President Joe Biden's son Beau Biden returned to work Wednesday as Delaware attorney general, two weeks after undergoing an unspecified medical procedure at a Houston cancer center.

The 44-year-old Biden was meeting with staff, said Jason Miller, a spokesman for the state Department of Justice.

Biden was admitted last month to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center after becoming weak and disoriented during a vacation in Indiana.

His hospitalization came two weeks after emergency dispatchers received a call from the vice president's Delaware home, where Beau Biden has been staying, regarding a report of a possible stroke. Biden suffered a minor stroke in 2010.

Biden's family has said he underwent "a successful procedure" in Houston, but they have not provided any details.

Biden's return to his office coincided with the refusal by New Castle County officials to release a recording of the 911 call made from his father's home on Aug. 1.

In a letter Wednesday denying a Freedom of Information Act request from The Associated Press, county attorney Bernard Pepukayi said that "after careful consideration," he concluded that the recording was not subject to public disclosure under two provisions of Delaware's FOIA.

One of the provisions allows an exemption for medical files whose disclosure could constitute an invasion of personal privacy. That came even though Bill Streets, an official who handles FOIA requests to the county Department of Public Safety, had earlier told the AP that personal identifying information would be redacted from any recording.

The other provision cited by Pepukayi allows the withholding of records that, if copied or inspected, could jeopardize the security of a government-owned structure, facilitate the planning of a terrorist attack, or endanger the life or physical safety of an individual.