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When creating the oilboard stencil pieces I usuall
When creating the oilboard stencil pieces I usually make multiple versions at once. In this case I'm taking individual sentences from Richter and layering them willy-nilly on top of each other creating a mashup. I love how they finish, but this one, in the process of drying, still has more layers to go. 30 x 39". Oilboard and acrylic on panel.
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The Princess and the Frog King II-Gouache and chal
The Princess and the Frog King II-Gouache and chalk pastel on paper-22 x 30 inches
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77.4
77.4" x 58" Archival Pigment Print, "Horse" ClampArt Gallery, New York October 18th - December 21st, 2012
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In Good Company, 2012, acrylic and spray paint on
In Good Company, 2012, acrylic and spray paint on photograph, 21″x 24"
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Configuration (2012) 
7ft x 2ft x 2ft each 
Bloo
Configuration (2012) 7ft x 2ft x 2ft each Blood, preserved on plexiglass, UV resin, blood dust http://www.JordanEagles.com
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The Art of Translation, 68 x 92 in., Oil/Canvas, 2
The Art of Translation, 68 x 92 in., Oil/Canvas, 2013, dougargue.com, edelmanarts.com
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Chamber 6 - Ledge, 48 x 60
Chamber 6 - Ledge, 48 x 60", Light jet print Image courtesy of the artist and Cooper Cole Gallery, Toronto
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Decoded
Decoded
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Daisy in front of Trailer (from Hitchhiker / Till
Daisy in front of Trailer (from Hitchhiker / Till Death do us Part), 2005, 125x123cm, Edition of 5, C-Print mounted on aluminum, based on a Polaroid part of the ongoing art-project 29 Palms, CA "Till Death Do Us Part" is the story of two young lovers, Margarita and Cristal - lonely souls escaping the abuse of reality into each other. Daisy McCrackin is Cristal, the gender confused, love hungry, desert born waif.
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Pieter Hugo
From the series Permanent Error
Al H
Pieter Hugo From the series Permanent Error Al Hasan Abukari, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana, 2009 Digital C-Print © Pieter Hugo, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York and Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town The subjects, of Hugo’s portraits are young men sent by their families from impoverished outlying villages, are photographed full-figure and directly engaged with Hugo’s medium-format camera. With each portrait, Hugo draws the viewer into the conditions imposed on this slum community and their effects on individuals. Collectively, the photographs expose consequences of the West’s consumption of ever-new technology and its disposal of outmoded products in poor countries ill- equipped to recycle them.
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