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What Does Coffman Think Romney's "More Conservative Message" Should Look Like?

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Mike Coffman appeared on KNUS' morning show, Kelley and Company, yesterday, and he came out swinging at Mitt Romney, saying that Romney "needs to have a more conservative message that appeals to the base of the Republican Party," that he "needs a more coherent, better defined economic and tax policy," and that the Santorum victory "changes the ballgame."

"Are we going to get the governor of Massachusetts [laughs] as the president?" Coffman asked on air. "Or are we going to get the guy who's saying what he's saying on the stump now?"

The interview made good radio, but the trouble was, host Steve Kelley didn't even try to get Coffman to be more specific about how Romney should move to the right, so listeners were left with little understanding of what Coffman thinks Romney should actually do and say in the real world away from the radio.

Kelley should have Coffman back on the show and ask him to, please, be more specific.

What's Romney's "more conservative message" look like?

What should Romney say to re-assure the GOP base that he's the "conservative guy?"

What aspects of Romney's economic policy are "cluttered" and how should Romney simplify things?

How, specifically, does Romney assure Republicans that they will not "get the governor of Massachusetts as the president?"

Kelley should invite Coffman back on the radio to answer these questions.

Click to hear Coffman on KNUS Kelley and Company 2-8-12.

Partial transcript of Coffman on Denver's KNUS (710 AM) Kelley and Company 2-8-12:

Coffman: It definitely changes the ballgame. I do think that Romney needs to have a more conservative message that appeals to the base of the Republican Party. And I think he's going to kind of re-examine his approach, his ground game, his message... This is not good for the Romney team. And it's good for the Santorum team...

Quite frankly, I think he's running for the general. Maybe he got over-confident and he refashioned his message more for the general election and a different electorate. And at some point in time, I think you do pivot, and I think he did that pivot a little too early. And I think he's going to have to backtrack and make sure that, and say, hey, look, this is what I am going to do in terms of advancing conservative causes and in terms of repealing some of the things this administration has put in place. So I think he needs to re-assure the Republican electorate that he's going to do that...

I think what [Romney] has to do is retool his own message, and I think he has to retool his own message in terms of, you know, appealing to the conservative base. You know. Because I think there are a lot of conservatives who don't trust him in that they worry that, you know, who is this guy? Do we really know him? Are we going to get the governor of Massachusetts [laughs] as the president? Or are we going to get the guy who's saying what he's saying on the stump now? And so I think he needs to reassure the Republican voters that, hey, I'm going to be the conservative guy. I am going to repeal Obamacare even though he said [laughs] that on the stump quite a bit. And I think he needs a more coherent, better defined economic and tax policy. It's a little cluttered. It's a little complicated. He needs to drill down to where it makes sense certainly to the average Republican voter in this primary.

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