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The Best GOP Argument for Immigration Reform That You Never Hear on Conservative Talk Radio

07/09/2013 04:08 pm ET | Updated Sep 08, 2013

A law reforming America's immigration system would help Republicans more than Democrats.

That's the bizarre truth that conservative pundits should pause and think about before continuing to bash federal immigration-reform efforts.

The current Republican playbook, of demonizing immigrants or scaring people about border security, with the possible hope of attracting swing voters or mobilizing base voters, isn't working. (See the last two presidential elections and races large and small across the U.S.)

Instead, it's caused Hispanics, already inclined to lean left, to become an even more solid Democratic bloc.

This will only get worse if the GOP congressmen, like Coffman, continue to insult Hispanics by voting not only against immigration reform but for deporting young undocumented immigrants who were raised in America, consider it their home, and were brought to this country through no fault of their own.

The conservatives on talk radio respond to this by essentially saying, so what?

What really bothers them isn't offending Hispanics. It's giving 12 million undocumented immigrants the opportunity to become U.S citizens and vote. This will kill an already dying Republican Party, overwhelming America with new Democratic voters.

Really? It's unclear how many new immigrants will even become citizens, but, in any case, it will take about 13 years or more! Who knows what America will look like then and the political dynamics that will be in play.

And if they accept immigration reform, and stop painting themselves as anti-Hispanic, Republicans will have a realistic prayer of reaching out to Hispanics and bringing them into the GOP tent.

There's a chance, as new Hispanic immigrants become more integrated into American life, and more successful, that they'll like the Republican anti-government talking points more than they do now.

But there's zero hope of this happening if the Republican brand represents hostility toward Hispanics.

Isn't this argument at least worth debating on the conservative airwaves?

The current GOP strategy is good if you want to lose elections, and the GOP is doing a great job of it. But if you want to win, it's not working.

Accepting immigration reform, with a path to citizenship, might stop the GOP bleeding, even just a little bit -- and provide hope in the long term, particularly when you compare it to the absence of hope for the GOP in the status quo.

Plus, passing immigration reform is the right thing to do. My interred illegal-immigrant Italian in-laws will tell you that.