Huffpost Religion
THE BLOG

Featuring fresh takes and real-time analysis from HuffPost's signature lineup of contributors

Jaweed Kaleem Headshot

Faith Shift: What Religion Stories Should We Write About Next?

Posted: Updated:
Print

Just over a week ago, The Huffington Post launched an ambitious series on religion called "Faith Shift," aiming to take an in-depth look at major religious changes happening across America's diverse spiritual landscape.

The stories, which will roll out over the next year, stem from broader changes taking place in American society related to immigration, population shifts, secularization, and increasingly liberal social and theological attitudes among young people that have created a moment of unprecedented upheaval and religious transformation. At the same time, the political conversation is dominated by conservative Christian ideas that are finding new audiences.

These changes are affecting everybody's lives, whether they are believers or not. Though on-the-ground, character-driven stories, we hope to show how people of varied faiths and cultures are reacting and adapting to such contemporary issues.

Our first story, which focused on a group called Muslims for Progressive Values, was about a nascent and controversial movement of Muslims expanding the faith to include gay and women prayer leaders. Its work is part of a larger movement of Muslim reformers, from those whose causes range from fighting radicalization and educating young people to building interfaith bridges and protecting women's rights.

In upcoming installments, we will look at a new generation of American Buddhists, the state of black churches and changes in Catholicism and Mormonism. We'll also report on the "nones," a new demographic of young people who define themselves as "spiritual, but not religious."

But this is just a sampling. To get the fullest picture of religion in the United States, we need your help.

Is there a unique house of worship in your community that deserves our attention?

Do you know of a religious movement or clergy member that represents larger shifts happening in religion today?

What should we write about next?

Leave your thoughts in the comments section below. If a reader suggests something you like, "favorite" it to let us know that you're behind it.

We're excited to hear your ideas.