THE BLOG
10/06/2011 11:34 am ET | Updated Dec 06, 2011

What Would Apple Do?

Here is a snippet from What Would Google Do? about Apple as the grand exception to every rule I put forth there:

How does Apple do it? How does it get away with operating this way even as every other company and industry is forced to redefine itself? It's just that good. Its vision is that strong and its products even better. I left Apple once, in the 1990s, before Steve Jobs returned to the company, when I suffered through a string of bad laptops. But when I'd had it with Dell, I returned to Apple and now everyone in my family has a Mac (plus one new Dell); we have three iPhones; we have lots of iPods; I lobbied successfully to make Macs the standard in the journalism school where I teach. I'm a believer, a glassy-eyed cultist. But I didn't write this book about Apple because I believe it is the grand exception. Frank Sinatra was allowed to violate every rule about phrasing because he was Sinatra. Apple can violate the rules of business in the next millennium because it is Apple (and more important, because Jobs is Jobs).

So then Apple is the ultimate unGoogle. Right?

Not so fast. When I put that notion to Rishad Tobaccowala [strategist at advertising conglomerate Publicis], he disagreed and said that Apple and Google, at their cores, are quite alike.

"They have a very good idea of what people want," he said. Jobs' "taste engine" makes sure of that. Both companies create platforms that others can build upon--whether they are start-ups making iPod cases and iPhone apps or entertainment companies finding new strategies and networks for distribution in iTunes.

Apple, like Google, also knows how to attract, retain, and energize talent. "Apple people believe they are even better than Google people," he said. "They're cooler."

Apple's products, like Google's, are designed simply, but Tobaccowala said Apple does Google one better: "They define beauty as sex," he said.

Apple understands the power of networks. Its successful products are all about connecting. Apple, like Google, keeps its focus unrelentingly on the user, the customer--us--and not on itself and its industry. And I'll add that, of course, both companies make the best products. They are fanatical about quality.

But Tobaccowala said that what makes these two companies most alike is that--like any great brand--they answer one strong desire: "People want to be like God." Google search grants omniscience and Google Earth, with its heavenly perch, gives us God's worldview. Apple packages the world inside objects of Zen beauty. Both, Tobaccowala said, "give me Godlike power." WWGD? indeed.