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Jerry Lanson Headshot

Can Mitt Romney Play Both Sides of the Moderate-Conservative Divide?

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Mitt Romney may need a wingspan as wide as Big Bird's to house the big tent of contrary positions he's taken in this race.

This priceless Daily Kos video of Romney debating himself pretty much sums up the inconsistency of Romney's positions. (This is video people: The Democrats aren't making it up.)

But it represents just a slice of Romney's unrelenting zigzagging. Let's just say the man does not need to buy a waffle iron. He's got one built in.

Romney, the conservative wants to eliminate "Obamacare" -- the Affordable Care Act -- though it was modeled after the plan he put into effect as governor of Massachusetts. And in the last 48 hours alone, he's made two turns on abortion.

On Tuesday he slid toward the center, telling the Des Moines Register that, "there's no legislation with regards to abortion that I'm familiar with that would become part of my agenda."

Soon after, noted CBSNews.com, "The Romney campaign sought to walk back the comments .... 'Gov. Romney would of course support legislation aimed at providing greater protections for life,' spokeswoman Andrea Saul said, declining to elaborate."

A day later, the London Guardian noted: "Mitt Romney and his running mate Paul Ryan were scrambling on Wednesday to present a coherent position on abortion..."

Romney, the paper noted, told reporters in Ohio that, "I think I've said time and again that I'm a pro-life candidate and I'll be a pro-life president."

Who says the Mittster can't have things both ways -- or more precisely, one way to fit one audience and the opposite to fit another? At times, he's sort of like watching a swinging gate.

The national polls show that Romney has pulled to just about dead even, but I'd hate to believe that one debate's bounce can last through election day. The way I see it is this: the American public in the end will never trust a guy to be president who caged his dog on the roof of his car during a family trip. Whatever the man believes, it pretty much sums up just how warm and caring he isn't -- even more than his comment dismissing 47 percent of Americans.