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Jesse Kornbluth

Jesse Kornbluth

Posted: September 7, 2010 11:20 AM

The reason it's important not to buy bottled water is that everybody does. In America, that's $11.5 billion worth of water a year. Crazy. Or, as George Carlin put it: "What is Evian spelled backwards?"

Americans spend more on gourmet water per year than we do on our water systems. The amount of fossil fuel we use to make the plastic bottles in a single year could power a million cars. And here's the craziest thing about bottled water: 25% to 40% comes from a public tap.

Well, if you're going to pay for tap water, why not start with tap water and filter it yourself?

That is the light bulb idea behind Bobble Water Bottles. (To buy Bobble Bottles from Amazon, click here. To buy replacement filters from Amazon, click here.) Take the 18.5 ounce water bottle and fill it with tap water. Screw in the filter and mouthpiece. Lift. Squeeze gently. Drink.

What does the carbon filter remove? Chlorine, for one. Biological pollutants? Sorry. No. But turning tap water into a refreshing drink isn't shabby. Neither is this: One water filter is good for about 300 bottles, or two months worth of water. And the bottle, which is made from recycled materials, is 100% recyclable. Just don't put it into your dishwasher!



The colorful, attention-getting Bobble is the invention of Karim Rashid, a prolific and inspired designer. He created the Oh Chair and the Garbo trash can. If you're interested in design, you might want one of his books, KarimSpace: The Interior Design and Architecture of Karim Rashid.

Rashid has written:

I believe that we could be living in an entirely different world -- one that is full of real contemporary inspiring objects, spaces, places, worlds, spirits and experiences.

My real desire is to see people live in the modus of our time, to participate in the contemporary world, and to release themselves from nostalgia, antiquated traditions, old rituals, kitsch and the meaningless. We should be conscious and attune with this world in this moment. If human nature is to live in the past, to change the world is to change human nature.


I find those sentiments inspiring. I want to live in the next world -- that is, one that makes me feel clean and guilt-free. I'm willing to have my nature changed. And it thrills me that I can participate in this change, one bottle at a time.

Cross-posted from HeadButler.com.