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Jodie Levin-Epstein
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Jodie Levin-Epstein is Deputy Director of CLASP, a national non-profit organization which promotes policy solutions that work for low income people. As part of her focus on the conditions of work—such as paid leave and workplace flexibility -- Jodie has written a variety of publications including Getting Punched: The Job and Family Clock.

Blog Entries by Jodie Levin-Epstein

"Comp-Time" in a Real-time World

(1) Comments | Posted April 10, 2013 | 2:15 PM

As Congressional Republicans seek a "softer focus" in how they define themselves after the 2012 election, the everyday needs of families are moving center stage. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is now talking about the importance of parental time away-from-work. Legislation is in the offing. Cantor...

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Sick Days Go Viral

(2) Comments | Posted March 29, 2013 | 5:25 PM

Around the nation, states and localities are enacting laws that provide a sick days labor standard, so that workers do not lose wages or jobs when the flu strikes.

This month, Portland, Oregon and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania both passed legislation (Philly awaits the Mayor's signature) and

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When Family Leave Crosses the Aisle

(1) Comments | Posted February 7, 2013 | 8:52 AM

All politicians -- whether Democratic or Republican -- have a mother. While their politics may differ, they share a need to care for parents and other family at some point in their lives. That's common ground.

Two decades ago on February 5, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)...

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Left Unsaid on Labor Day

(0) Comments | Posted September 10, 2012 | 3:57 PM

The summer of 1894 was filled with labor-management strife, and the congressional response included passage of a law that established Labor Day as a way to honor workers. Nearly 120 years later, Labor Day is a time of parades, picnics, and rest. Today, the assertion that "employees are the most...

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Say It Like Beckham

(0) Comments | Posted August 2, 2012 | 10:24 AM

With worldwide attention on the Olympics, soccer star David Beckham hopes that the Games will help him score interest in an international problem: child stunting. In his capacity as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, Beckham -- whose "ball bending" skills were popularized in the film Bend it Like Beckham...

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For Mother's Day: A Present That Values Families

(2) Comments | Posted May 11, 2012 | 4:52 PM

Mother's Day unifies the nation as we all scurry to find the right Hallmark card, fancy flowers or some proverbial chocolates to honor she who labored us into this world. The treats, however, can't sweeten a bitter fact: our country, while touting that it values families, gives scant evidence of...

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Is Marriage a Poverty-Buster?

(26) Comments | Posted April 10, 2012 | 10:12 PM

"The Myth of the Disappearing Middle Class" (Washington Post, March 29, 2012) by Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Ron Haskins asserts that the lack of opportunity in 21st century America is largely driven by the failure of individuals to behave responsibly, particularly the failure of parents to marry.

...
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Painting a Picture of Poverty in Utah: By the Numbers

(6) Comments | Posted April 3, 2012 | 11:37 AM

In Utah, a picture of poverty is about to get painted. The state legislature has unanimously passed a bill that will provide data on the extent of, and the demographics attached to, intergenerational poverty in the state. While Utah may be the only state with such a law, there is...

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The "Holeist" of Holes in the Safety Net

(61) Comments | Posted February 3, 2012 | 1:16 PM

Poor Mitt Romney. The fact is that the candidate is a rich man (no matter what his tax bracket), but equally true is that his "not concerned about the very poor" assertions in a CNN interview have made him a political piñata on both the right and the...

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Poverty Reduction: The Invisible Hand of Government

(260) Comments | Posted September 13, 2011 | 2:17 PM

Poverty data released today tells a cold truth about a rich nation that could do better. The U.S. is now home to 46.2 million poor people according to the latest Census Bureau report on income, poverty and health. That's about one in seven or 15.1 percent and the...

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Paid Sick Days Laws Could Become Contagious

(55) Comments | Posted June 10, 2011 | 1:23 PM

It may be time to say, "As Connecticut goes, so goes the nation." Any day now, Connecticut's governor is expected to place his John Hancock on a bill that will make Connecticut the first state in the nation to enact a minimum standard for paid sick days. That sends "an...

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Don't Cut Off Your Knows

(1) Comments | Posted March 7, 2011 | 2:42 PM

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke knows it. Education and training are central to our nation's economic competitiveness. In fact, he recently urged that budget deliberations recognize the benefits of programs that equip workers with needed skills -- even when we must grapple with difficult decisions around balancing state...

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New Record Poverty? Make Kids' Brains "Too Big to Fail"

(17) Comments | Posted September 16, 2010 | 11:04 AM

In 2009, the number of those officially poor is the highest ever recorded -- a total of 43.6 million according to the Census Bureau data released September 16th. That includes 3.7 million of us who became poor just in 2009, reflecting a 1.1 percent jump from 2008. These numbers may...

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Peaceful Revolution: Paid Leave Makes Horse Sense

(9) Comments | Posted January 4, 2010 | 1:38 PM

Vacations are good for your health. And, you don't need to get away to any fancy Caribbean retreat to get the benefit of time-off from work. But it helps if you are a horse. In New York City, that is.

The City's Health Department has proposed new...

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