THE BLOG

Why I'm Not Breaking up With America This Valentine's Day

02/13/2015 04:24 pm ET | Updated Apr 13, 2015

Almost every week I get an email from an American expatriate living outside the country who commiserates about the deplorable state of our freedoms in the United States, expounds on his great fortune in living outside the continental U.S., and urges me to leave the country before all hell breaks loose and my wife and children are tortured, raped, brutalized and killed.

Without fail, this gentleman concludes every piece of correspondence by questioning my sanity in not shipping my grandchildren off to some far-flung locale to live their lives free of fear, police brutality, and surveillance.

I must confess that when faced with unmistakable warning signs that the country I grew up in is no more, I have my own moments of doubt.

After all, why would anyone put up with a government that brazenly steals, cheats, sneaks, spies and lies, not to mention alienates, antagonizes and criminalizes its own citizens and then justifies it in the name of safety, security and the greater good?

Why would anyone put up with militarized police officers who shoot first and ask questions later, act as if their word is law, and operate as if they are above the law?

Why would anyone put up with government officials who live an elitist lifestyle while setting themselves apart from the populace, operate outside the rule of law, and act as if they're beyond reproach and immune from being held accountable?

Unfortunately, not only do we put up with a laundry list of tyrannies that make King George III's catalogue of abuses look like child's play, but most actually persist in turning a blind eye to them, acting as if what they don't see or acknowledge can't hurt them.

The sad reality, as I make clear in my book A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State, is that life in America is no bed of roses. Nor does it seem that things will get better anytime soon.

For instance, we're still being spied on by our own government. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) actually wants to make the NSA's mass surveillance a permanent practice.

Not only is the government unapologetic about spying on its citizens, but government agencies are using their collective surveillance data to carry out Orwellian pre-crime programs that attempt to nab "criminals" before they ever commit a crime. To do so, they have to study our social media posts, our buying habits, and where we travel to and from, and on and on.

We're still being treated as if we have no actual rights when it comes to our property, our bodies, our children or our welfare. It doesn't really matter what the justifications are for such taxes, regulations, prohibitions and fines: they result in us having little-to-no control over how we live our lives.

We're still bartering our freedoms away for the phantom promise of security, and we're no safer and much less freer than we were two decades ago.

We're still being fooled into thinking that politics matter and that there's a difference between the Republicans and Democrats, when in fact, the two parties are exactly the same.

Our communities are still being held hostage by militarized police. Despite the fleeting attention paid to the transformation of community police into extensions of the military, the transfer of military equipment from the federal government to localities continues unabated, with more than $28 million worth of tactical equipment distributed in the last quarter of 2014.

We're still exchanging one set of wars for another, to the delight and profit of the military industrial complex.

Every once in a while, we get tossed a bone to satisfy that gnawing, nagging hunger for something that looks and tastes like freedom, democracy and free enterprise. Political elections, town-hall meetings, awards ceremonies, sports spectacles, high-dollar lotteries, reality TV shows, morning news programs and patriotic-themed blockbuster movies: these are all the trappings of a so-called free nation without the substance.

Temporarily assuaged, easily distracted and suffering from an appalling case of public amnesia, we fall right back into our complacency and compliance, content to turn a blind eye to blatant abuses, forgive past transgressions, and forget all of the reasons why we should be mad as hell about the state of our nation.

So why do I stay? Why do any of us continue to put up with the gut-wrenching, soul-sucking, misery-drenched, demoralizing existence that is America today?

Perhaps I stay because I was raised to believe that anything worth having is worth fighting for, and I believe with every fiber of my being that freedom matters. In fact, I come from a long line of Americans who understood that there is a price to be paid for freedom, whether that means standing up to the British military, sitting down in a bus seat reserved for "whites only," or pushing back against corporations who pollute our waters and pillage our lands for profit.

Perhaps I soldier on because I remember what it was like to grow up at a time when the only surveillance I had to worry about were the neighbors who reported back to my mother whenever I did something wrong, and I desperately want my grandchildren to experience that kind of carefree existence. I want them to know that there's more to life than metal detectors, lockdowns, and random searches.

Perhaps I persevere because I know that there are genuinely concerned Americans out there who want to pitch in and turn things around for the better. As long as there is this small but vocal minority who cares enough to stand up and speak out, then all is not completely lost.

Perhaps I stick it out because I know that surveillance, over-criminalization, militarized police, power-hungry politicians and greedy corporations are not exclusive to America, and there's nowhere you can escape to where tyranny cannot follow.

Most of all, perhaps I keep fighting on because I'm just not ready to give up on America. At least, not yet.