THE BLOG

To My Future Child-in-Law

07/24/2013 06:38 pm ET | Updated Sep 23, 2013
Judy Bolton-Fasman

Dear Future Child-in-Law:

I've been dreaming about you for a long time. I've already conjured you with a heady mix of my imagination, my heart and my soul, where you are the perfect mate for my child. A romantic like me might say you complete my child, but the truth is my daughter and son were whole and perfect from the day they were born.

I'll admit that I'm a little jealous of you. You will know my child like no other person in the world. And you will take my place as the primary person in her life. It's hard to cede that top spot to you, even if it is right and natural. But if all goes well, I won't be giving my child away so much as gaining another child. Let's face it: Initially, you and I are solely bound to each other through my daughter or son. I pray that I will be gracious and wise enough to welcome you into my life as if you were my own.

It has always amazed me that two people can come together and make a family from love and optimism and grit. No matter how much you think you and your beloved have in common, you are two distinct and different people. It's the ensuing friction and magnetism that makes marriage so challenging and compelling.

Before I go on, I need to make it perfectly clear that if you ever hurt my child, you will have to answer to me. I don't care how old he is. As long as there is blood coursing through my veins and breath powering my lungs, I will be fiercely protective of my child. I know this sounds like bravado. It's not. I recognize that I will sometimes disagree with you as well as witness you and my child having a row or two. I won't step in; it's not my place. But if I ever see you truly hurting my kid physically or emotionally, nothing will stop me from coming to her aid.

I also need to tell you that I hope you are Jewish. I will respect my child's decision to marry anyone that he loves. I won't stand in the way if you are not a Jew. However, if I'm completely honest with myself, I have to admit that if you are not Jewish, a part of me will be disappointed. Judaism's values and the paths it forges for us in the world have shaped our lives for the better. I hope Judaism will do that for you too and that you will bring up my grandchildren as Jews. This is not to say that I won't grow to love you as much as I would my child's Jewish partner. Notice that I used the word "grow" to describe our relationship. Any in-law relationship has to put down roots.

Let me also make it perfectly clear that being Jewish won't instantly endear me to you. More than anything, there are practical considerations for choosing a Jewish partner. In my mind, Jews share a unique vocabulary and set of feelings with one another. I love the fact that I can go to any synagogue in the world and follow the service in Hebrew. To me, that's a grand metaphor that speaks volumes about marrying a fellow Jew. Marriage is hard enough without adding a different religion to the mix. I also have to confess to you that I spent a lot of blood, sweat and tears to give my children a Jewish education. Both of them went to day school. I can't say that either of my teenage children is traditionally religious. But their hearts and souls are Jewish. This is not an empirical point. I'm just a mother who knows her children. And I'm a wiser adult who once thought that marrying a Jewish partner was secondary to love. I suppose that in some cases it is. All I'm saying is that marrying a Jew will more likely give me Jewish grandchildren.

I can see where you might misinterpret my desire for a Jewish child-in-law as bigoted. I promise you that it's not. My wish for Jewish grandchildren is as much demographic as it is spiritual. We Jews are a vocal yet tiny minority in this world. We can't afford to lose whatever little ground we cover. Having said that, I've told my children early and often that I love them unconditionally. Unconditional love, though, does not necessarily equate with happiness. It simply means that I'm committed to my children for life and, by association, to you as well.

When each of my children became a bat and bar mitzvah, the rabbi's charge included a blessing that my husband and I have the joy of escorting our children to the huppah -- the marriage canopy. I look forward to that day. And I look forward to meeting you, new child of mine.

With Love,

Judy