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Deja Vu in NY 23rd?

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Voters in New York State's Congressional District 23rd are headed to the polls on Tuesday. And it looks like it might be a rerun of the 2009 Special Election.

Matthew A. Doheny faces Tea Party hero Douglas L. Hoffman. Reliving the 2009 Special Election, though, is not what the party wants in America's northernmost Congressional District.

Doheny wonders why the guy, who couldn't pull it off before, would be able to ace it a year later.

"I'm unsure why he would do the same thing again. Einstein has a great definition of insanity. Doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different result," said Doheny.

In 2009, Hoffman got the support of Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin and Rush Limbaugh. Right-wing radio slammed then-Republican nominee Dede Scozzafava.

After a national talk-slaught, she dropped out of the race. When she bailed, she endorsed Democrat Bill Owens who won the traditionally-held Republican seat.

The Einstein comment caused the Tea Party CPA to bristle. "Where were you, Matt, in October, when you gave the maximum to Dede Scozzafava. Who did you vote for in the election? That tells how Conservative you really are," Hoffman said.

At that recent debate, Doheny shot back. "I have the ability to win, unfortunately, like last time, my opponent doesn't."

Meanwhile, the Hoffman campaign is trying to blunt talk of a third-party run. "We are not surprised that in the final days before the Republican Primary, liberal Republican Matt Doheny is using the 'spoiler argument' in an attempt to rescue his lackluster and ill-conceived campaign that is failing to ignite interest among GOP Primary voters," a press release noted.

The so-called 'spoiler argument' is based on Hoffman's threat to run as an independent if he loses the Primary. That, in a nutshell, is what happened last-time around when Owens won because of either default or, more politely explained: voter confusion.