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Kristen Psaki

Kristen Psaki

Posted: November 11, 2010 10:02 PM

I met Elaine Langley in New Orleans, LA back in June while trying to connect with one of the many state and federally recognized Native American tribes deeply impacted by the April BP oil rig explosion.

Point-au-Chien Indian Tribe is a state-recognized tribe with roughly 700 members nestled along Bayou Point-au-Chien in South Louisiana. The community and its neighbor tribe on Isle de Jean Charles faced catastrophic impacts on their land, livelihood, and futures as a result of the 180,000,000 gallons of oil ("millions" isn't quite as powerful) carelessly dumped into their waters.

During this holiday season Elaine and her crew of volunteers will bring cheer, gifts, comfort, and food to many tribal families during a small and proud parade lead by Chief Albert of Isle de Jean Charles. The oil spill has introduced a new threat to the tribes, but their strength has brought them through years of hurricanes and significant coastal erosion (much of which was a result of canals dug by major oil companies in the early 20th century).

Elaine volunteers with Plenty International, an organization with an understanding that there is enough (plenty, in fact) if we all share. Clever, and true. Plenty has been working with the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians for a number of years and this December will mark the third toy giveaway parade brought to the tribes. But, they need help. Elaine is currently collecting toys for the children of the tribe (0-18yrs). Please send her an email if you'd like to donate, and/or with any questions: elaineml@bellsouth.net

Take a look at a short video below of Elaine and Pointe-au-Chien tribal leader Theresa Dardar express the real impacts of the oil spill:

Elaine: elaineml@bellsouth.net
Happy Holidays.