THE BLOG

Why You Should Ignore the Pressure For 'Happily Ever After'

06/05/2015 03:51 pm ET | Updated Jun 05, 2016
Lacey Johnson

I was about 7 years old when one of my neighborhood friends and I began discussing the frightful notion of growing up and never getting married. Looking back, it seems odd to me, for we were far from even approaching puberty at the time. I suppose our hours of viewing Disney movies must have done a fantastic job of creating an expectation that if we did not someday find our princes, our lives would be forever incomplete.

Upon reaching my 21st birthday, all of the little old ladies at my grandma's church gradually began asking me when I was going to "settle down and get married." Some ladies would say with a wink, "Well, somebody is missing out, honey." Others would stare at me with a puzzled expression as I told them I wanted to do more with my life than just become somebody's wife. I began to realize the expectation to be married often creates an urgency which then distracts people from what the true deciding factors in regards to choosing a mate should be. I have to wonder, why is there this expectation and judgment? What for, and, most importantly, who for?

Beware, For The Whisper Shall Become A Raging Roar...

Your soul is always going to whisper your truth back to you. You can only fool yourself for so long. If you get married because of some societal expectation to do so, because it is what all of your girlfriends are doing or because you believe another human being is going to complete you, your truth will eventually emerge, perhaps angrily, under however many layers of convincing it took for you to follow through with it. Your soul wants what is best for you and if you try to silence its voice, eventually the whisper will become a raging roar.

Prior to meeting my husband, I had a series of committed relationships, beginning just after high school. One of my boyfriends tried to convince me to elope with him in the midst of our relationship crumbling. I suppose he believed that marriage would wipe all of our issues away forever, however despite my wisdom to permanently leave the relationship at the appropriate time, I knew better than to marry him. I could not rest in such a decision. Each time it presented itself, my truth emerged, rather frantically. There was always a big, fat, emphatic banner marked "NO!", flying high inside of my mind. Had I ignored it, I would have betrayed myself.

Later this year, I will be celebrating three years of being married. When I look in my husband's eyes, I know he is the best friend I have ever had. However, the reality is that even the coziest marriage is not warm cookies and milk every hour of every day.

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Marriage is not a steamy love scene every night. It's not always a chapter plucked from a romance novel, feeding each other berries and making out for hours on end until your lips are chapped and swollen. It's not always the wind in your hair and hot breath on the nape of your neck. Sometimes it is those things, but not every day. Gaining a husband does not guarantee having your worries washed away forever. I promise you. If you believe that, you need a long, ice cold shower of a reality check.

Having a husband will not complete you. It will not quiet the truth inside. It will not wipe the tears of your heart's cry. It will not silence any storm inside of you. It will not complete your life's mission. It will not paint the sky blue forever. I'm sorry that I'm not sorry to tell that it just won't.

Can you handle some truth? Fasten your seat belt.

You're not just marrying his charm, his wit and his blue eyes that sparkle in the sunlight. You're not just marrying the smirk that makes your stomach flip every time you see it. You're not just marrying his manly architecture, earth-shattering as it may be. You're also marrying his spending habits, idiosyncrasies, knee-jerk reactions, insecurities and worst of days. You're also marrying his family. And, you know what? He is marrying all of yours, too. Bless him, right?

Even the most compatible of circumstances will consist of trying times, so it would not be wise to commit to something you will be unable to live with for years to come. For example, if you are a passionate animal rights activist, it would not be wise to marry an unapologetic carnivore, regardless of how magical of chemistry the two of you share. If you hate the smell of patchouli, you are going to be in a great deal of trouble if you marry someone who loves bathing in its oil.

A husband is not a savior. He cannot be your zen. He is not a white knight waiting for the perfect moment to ride in. Some nights I have tears in my eyes because it feels as though there have never been two people more in love than my husband and I. Some nights the fireworks light up the sky effortlessly, however some nights I must consciously participate in creating them. Loving, honoring and cherishing in good times and bad is not always the easiest task. My life is undeniably more joyful, richer and sweeter since marrying my husband, however it is not perfection. There is not a person on the planet with a perfect life.

You Are Better Off Alone Than Married To The Wrong Person

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So, before you get married, take off your rose-tinted glasses, wipe the fairy dust from your eyes and take an honest look at him in the light of reality. Do not allow yourself to die to your truth. Forget what society says is the norm. Forget how many of your friends are getting married. Forget settling. For a moment, forget the notion of feeling like a princess in that extraordinary dress you saw on Pinterest, or the possibility of doves flying above your head. You are better off alone than being married to the wrong person.

Marry him because when his heart connects with your heart, it feels like a call from home. Marry him because you have confidence in his character. Marry him because he inspires you to be a higher version of yourself. Marry him because he is the only person you foresee wanting to eat puréed potatoes with when you're 90.

I'm just being honest.

The original and extended version of this article can be read on The Daily Doll.