THE BLOG
06/19/2013 09:44 am ET | Updated Aug 18, 2013

Giving Back Through Fashion

The topic of fast fashion always raises an interesting debate, with many a question posed over the ethical, financial and moral aspects of where materials for our clothes are sourced and how our garments are made.

That's why it is good to see a company such as MAONO committed to providing superior quality clothing at attainable prices. The online clothing retailer has thrived with an innovative business model. MAONO follows the principles of a B corporation -- a business that aims to voluntarily meet higher standards of transparency, accountability and performance by offering a positive vision of a better way to do business. B corporations also use the power of business to solve social and environmental problems, such as using chemical free materials and leather from cruelty free suppliers.

MAONO is the brainchild of founder Syga Thomas, and was established in 2011 in Washington D.C. As a socially conscious entrepreneur and champion for causes aimed towards helping youth and education, Thomas has a solid background of helping those less fortunate than themselves. MAONO is an active venture highlighting Thomas's belief in assisting others, whilst creatively cutting out the middleman in his business in order to donate the savings (accounting to 5 percent,) to the Boys and Girls Club of Greater D.C.

This innovative approach by a considerate business actively interested in its local environment and community must be the way forward if the industry is to collectively challenge some of the moral stigmas attached to fast fashion and its manufacturing processes.

As a vertically integrated brand producing some of the best quality products on the market, MAONO is demonstrating itself as a lifestyle brand for men and women not afraid to push boundaries. They have taken the principles of ethics and consideration for the consumer to heart, elevating itself as a model for future businesses and those already established in the industry to take note of.

Ethically sourced and designed MAONO products are available online and at select pop-up locations, enabling the company to keep costs to a minimum whilst transferring the savings to both the customer and the community.

The B corporation route can really be a successful way of making business ethical, and we have seen this in action through companies such as Ben and Jerry's, Etsy and eyeglass provider Warby Parker. I hope that more start-ups and businesses consider the B corporation route when establishing and running their business, and as someone interested in fashion and how the industry is run, I look forward to following MAONO's progress over the coming months and years.