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Moms Gone Wild: The Real Housewives of Orthodox Judaism

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I think of Facebook as an evolving scrapbook of my life as a mother, one that my son could look back on one day with great affection. I can hear him now. "February 17, 2008: that's the day Mommy said she was giving up pubic hair for Lent!" "Oh, here's a picture of Mommy showing her cleavage to celebrate Boobquake!" "Wow, Mommy sure talked about Klonopin a lot. A LOT."

So yes, Facebook is where I "use my words" quite vividly to fight my haus frau doldrums. Does this make me a PTA pariah? Do I get finger-wagging from older family members? Would a boss not hire such a self-involved exhibitionist? Don't care, don't care, don't care. (Not caring is a nice perk of self-involvement, I find.) So for me the consequences of expressing myself seem low.

That's why I watched the latest episode of my friend Valerie Frank's show, In Over Our Heads, with such fascination. My nickname for In Over Our Heads is "The View for Jews." Led by producer Malkah Winter, you meet young Jews, Valerie, and a cast of others and watch them try to navigate their commitment to their faith with the realities of the modern world.

This isn't much of an issue for Valerie, who, as a Reform Jew and all-around live-wire, is quite comfortable expressing both her edgy hilarity and spectacular cleavage. But not so for orthodox Jewish women who risk facing severe consequences and judgment from their husbands, other mothers, and parents -- really their entire community -- when they bust out of custom. And bust out they do in the latest episode, with an Orthodox mom going clubbing in New York, something she does regularly, this time taking another mom for her very first night out dancing. Take a look. The second part of the episode can be found on YouTube or at inoverourheads.com. In Over Your Heads airs on Jewish Television on DirecTV in 50 states.

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