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Margaret Honey
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Dr. Margaret Honey, president and CEO, joined the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) in 2008. She is widely recognized for her work using educational technologies to support children’s learning across science, technology, engineering and math. Having recognized the potential for the “maker” movement to inspire young people with the joy of learning about STEM, she has established a partnership with Maker Faire which was held for the second year in a row at NYSCI. Dr. Honey also co-edited Design, Make, Play: Growing the Next Generation of STEM Innovators, which features insights from top policymakers, researchers and educators on ways to inspire and motivate young people about science and technology learning.

Prior to joining NYSCI, she served as a vice president of the Education Development Center and director of EDC’s Center for Children and Technology, where she oversaw large-scale projects funded by National Science Foundation, the Institute for Education Sciences, The Carnegie Corporation, The Library of Congress, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others.

Dr. Honey has helped to shape some of the best thinking about learning and technology with special attention to traditionally underserved audiences. She has directed numerous research projects including efforts to identify teaching practices and assessments for 21st century skills; new approaches to teaching computational science in high schools; collaborations with some of the nation’s largest public television stations; investigations of data-driven decision-making tools and practices; and with colleagues at Bank Street College of Education, she created one of the first internet-based professional development programs in the country.

Entries by Margaret Honey

Developing Solvers, Not Hackers

(0) Comments | Posted April 22, 2013 | 2:09 PM

Last week, the New York Times' Dealbook blog profiled Girls Who Code, an organization that attempts to close the gender gap in the technology industry by teaching young women a basic job skill -- how to write code.

The piece is completely on target,...

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