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Pew Report: Core Values and Attittudes

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Yesterday, the Pew
Research Center
released another one of their massive must-read reports. This
one summarizes 20 years on "Political Values and Core Attitudes" (summary, full report), as updated
with a survey conducted in late December and early January. While the report
covers a lot of territory, the authors see in their various measures an
improved "political landscape for Democrats" stemming from "increased public
support for the social safety net, signs of growing public concern about income
inequality, and a diminished appetite for assertive national security policies."

03-23%20pew%20party%20id.png

Regular readers of this blog will appreciate their summary
of recent trends in party identification:

Even more striking than the changes
in some core political and social values is the dramatic shift in party
identification that has occurred during the past five years. In 2002, the
country was equally divided along partisan lines: 43% identified with the
Republican Party or leaned to the GOP, while an identical proportion said they
were Democrats. Today, half of the public (50%) either identifies as a Democrat
or says they lean to the Democratic Party, compared with 35% who align with the
GOP.

The report also rolls together more than two years worth of
Pew surveys to provide a helpful state-by-state analysis of the ideology of
Democrats and Republicans in the various primary states. Their summary provides
a hint of the differences found (full profiles are found on pp. 10-11):

[P]olitically conservative, white
evangelical Christians make up 10% of all Republicans and Republican leaners in
New Hampshire - currently the first state to hold its presidential primaries in
2008 - but 39% of all GOP partisans in South Carolina where primary voters go
to the polls several days later. On the Democratic side, the proportion of
Democrats who say they are politically liberal ranges from 38% in California to 25% in South Carolina.

The full report has much, much more, and is well worth the click.