The Swan Song of School

04/23/2015 06:53 pm ET | Updated Jun 23, 2015
Melinda Wentzel

I have a love-hate relationship with the end of my children's school year (i.e. that inimitable wedge of time that is at once delicious and detestable -- conveniently sandwiched between the intensity of academics and the celebrated death of structure). To most, it would seem like a fairly simple dichotomy: Either one richly embraces said collection of days during the frenzied months of April, May and a goodly portion of June or, conversely, harbors maniacal thoughts of lighting that portion of the calendar on fire. But for me, it has always been a more complex matter as I am torn between the two extremes.

Indeed, part of me completely loathes the end-of-school-year insanity -- especially the frenetic pace at which we parents must perform. We dutifully ferry our charges hither and yon without complaint, cram our schedules with more events than it is humanly possible to attend and go above and beyond to ensure that the infinitely numbered details of our children's lives are perfectly coordinated and expertly managed -- that is until we are lulled into the lair of summer, when and where we can finally breathe. Then again, let us not forget the onslaught of camp registration deadlines that loom large, making us slightly unnerved over the uncertain nature of our so-called master plan for the coming months.

By the same token, another part of me is entirely enraptured by this particular chapter of parenthood. That said, there is a certain zeal with which my progenies now arise to greet the day on school mornings. And the greatly anticipated demise of the Homework Era alone is enough to make all concerned parties slightly euphoric. What's more, and against all logic and understanding, the obscene magnitude of activities slated to take place in the closing months -- to include field trips and outdoor events, career days and concerts, award ceremonies and parties galore -- somehow fill me with glee. Never mind the delirium-infused state my brood enjoys as a result, making it difficult for anyone and everyone in this household to get a good night's sleep prior to that which is deemed A BIG DAY. Lord knows we've experienced many such days (and sleepless nights) since the advent of spring and its characteristic ratcheting of school-sponsored events. Oy.

But the Land of Eighth Grade has been a decidedly good place, and I sometimes lament the fact that Thing One and Thing Two will progress to the shores of ninth grade next fall, ostensibly to bigger and better things. Besides, I've grown accustomed to the routine within which my family has functioned since the early days of September. More specifically, everyone beneath this roof knows his or her role and what is expected as it relates to the business of school and learning in general. Next year, I fear, will be different and disturbingly unfamiliar, with a learning curve we have yet to even imagine.

Needless to say, there is great comfort in sameness -- a predictable rhythm by which our days have been governed so very well for so very long. Part of me hates to see that disappear. Stranger still, I suspect that the laze and haze of summer will somehow deaden my children's collective passion for learning, erasing much of the progress we've made thus far and undermining the efforts of all who've had a hand in cultivating a love of books, an appreciation of music and art as well as a solid sense of self.

And yet, the summer holds a wealth of promise -- as it always does. And it will have its own rhythm and perhaps a different brand of enlightenment wrapped with the merest suggestion of routine--one with rounded edges and soft spots to land come July and August. But for now, my thoughts rest on the few days that remain on the school calendar -- a swan song of sorts.

Planet Mom: It's where I live (both loving and hating the end of school). Visit me there at and

Copyright 2011 Melinda L. Wentzel