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Bridalplasty: A Cut Below

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The new E! show Bridalplasty has been addressed via Huffington Post before, but it deserves a revisit. Some tweeps brought it up to me on Twitter and it just has to be addressed.

The show is hosted by Shanna Moakler, who apparently won some beauty contest awards but now I just stare at her dark roots and want to rush her into Sally Hershberger.

Bridalplasty's premise is to pit women up against each other (brides-to-be) and the winner gets "cut," aka she gets all the plastic surgery that Heidi Montag got, as some sort of prize for being the most shameless girl in the room.

This show is sort of a The Swan 2.0 (where "ugly ducklings" got plastic surgery makeovers) but it's so embarrassing that I can't help but try to dissect it. In this post, FFJD is more like Furious Fail & Judgment Dialogue. This show has finally pushed the envelope of shock-jock reality TV to a new and dangerous level. Not only is the premise insane (and on par with sketch comedy), but it's deeply saddening.

Plastic surgery has become such a nonchalant part of our culture that it seems like an ultimate desire. These women, instead of trying to transform themselves via healthier routes, would rather chop up their bodies. In an effort to be "perfect" on their wedding day, these women think that plastic surgery is the answer. They get "fat circled" (a fabled sorority hazing activity) for all to see, endless circles and half moons all over their "flab."

Who is this doctor? Why is he allowed to have a practicing medical license? I've always found it strange, the intersection of medical professionals with reality tv (Dr. 90210), etcetera, unless you're watching something altruistic for the bettering of medicine.

Scalpels and media whores should not intersect.

In the way that politics and entertainment have fused, so have medicine (especially plastic surgery) and TV. With the exception of Dr. Drew (I think everyone can benefit from his theories on addiction and therapy), no doctor should be involved in a reality show. To me, it's like this doctor has lost all credibility.

What's odder about the show, aside from 20 women vying to undergo unnecessary and dangerous surgery, is that they are continuing to fetishize the idea of the perfect bride on her wedding day, in an even stranger fashion.

Look at Kate Middleton, who has a great body, saying that she's going to the gym in preparation for her wedding, which is five months away. This be-all-end-all attitude about walking down the aisle is interesting and damaging. On your wedding day you should be happy, and that should be enough.

The saddest part of the show for me, is the husbands to be talking about their wives. None of them are into this idea anyway. Although they wouldn't want it to seem that they are pushing their future wife to get cut up in front of a television audience, most of the men seem disturbed by the idea.

What has become of our standards and pursuit of plastic beauty? I think the most beautiful women are unusual looking. I understand women wanting plastic surgery, but what I don't understand is this pursuit of artificial-looking beauty. I for one like to move my face.

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