THE BLOG

The Dumbest Mistake That Smart People Make

06/11/2015 12:51 pm ET | Updated Jun 11, 2016

It was a little past 1:00 a.m, and I sat alone at the dining room table. If only I had listened to my tired body and gone to sleep, I might have saved a friendship and a business partnership.

Instead, I pushed through and gave overly harsh feedback on a letter. It took me only a few minutes to send my feedback, but it damaged that relationship forever. The person never came back to me for feedback, and it contributed to a negative spiral in the relationship that ultimately failed.

That's when I learned the stakes of giving bad feedback. As leaders, parents, and friends, if we chronically give bad feedback we destroy relationships, make other people feel stupid, and stunt their growth.

Giving feedback incorrectly is one of the worst mistakes smart people are particularly prone to make. Experts tend to...

  • overestimate their expertise and give feedback in areas where they don't have expertise.
  • feel compelled to give feedback as a result of their expertise.
  • be condescending as a result of thinking something is obvious to others when it isn't.
  • be too general as a result of forgetting the little insights that make up ideas.

These disadvantages are collectively known as the curse of knowledge.

I interviewed 10 world-class leaders (including the founder of two television networks, a former Fortune 500 CEO, and similarly successful entrepreneurs) to get their perspective on how to give feedback in the best way. In the few minutes it takes to read this article, you'll have a whole new toolkit, which will immediately improve how you give feedback to others.

1. Help Employees Think Like Owners

Jason Duff

Jason Duff, founder and CEO of COMSTOR Outdoor

I think the best way for a CEO to give feedback is by letting his or her employees experience what it's like to be an owner.

I used to want to shield my team from the hard parts of what I do. The unintended result was employees who made poor decisions and developed beliefs that everything is easier than it actually is.

To inspire an ownership mindset, I follow two practices that work really well:

Job Shadowing. I'm a big believer in the idea that you can't really understand someone's perspective until you walk a mile in their shoes. I shadow my employees, and they shadow me as well as each other. This helps us understand each other, but also be nimble and step in when necessary.

Open Book Accounting. We recently moved our business to open book accounting, which means we share all of our financial numbers with our employees. This was a very difficult decision for me but I've been impressed with the outcome so far. Misconceptions about the money that I was, or was not making, have been completely put on the table. Many of my employees had a lot of sympathy with some of the financial goals, challenges, and tax consequences that the company was facing. They offered great ideas and suggestions about their roles and their compensations to help the company be more successful. I highly recommend The Great Game Of Business to learn about the power of open book accounting and how to implement it in your company.

2. Put On Your Welcome Face

Ryan Simonetti

Ryan Simonetti, co-founder of Convene

I have one core belief, based on research in Drive, that structures how I give feedback: People are intrinsically motivated to do a great job. They don't intentionally do bad work.

Most people I know take a tremendous amount of pride in their work and have an emotionally vested interest in both their success and that of their company.

What this means is that my job isn't to reprimand or judge people. My true job is to empower them. Given that most communication is nonverbal, the most important thing I can do is to be in the right state of mind before I give feedback. I call this putting on a 'welcome face'. To me this signifies "I'm open, compassionate, and excited to listen." If I can't immediately get myself to be authentically in that state, I will sleep on it.

Finally, I lead feedback discussions with an open-ended question like, "What is it about this project that you're especially proud of?" My goal is to put myself in the other person's shoes before I make judgments.

3. Follow the NORMS of Objectivity

Rohit Anabheri

Rohit Anabheri, founder of Circa Ventures

I use what I call the "NORMS approach" to keep the feedback objective rather than subjective. Here's how it works:

Not an interpretation. Describe the behavior, don't interpret why someone did something.

Observable. Focus on specific behavior or outcomes that are seen or heard.

Reliable. Two or more people independently agree on what they observed.

Measurable. Use facts to describe the behavior or result rather than superlatives like 'all the time' or 'always'.

Specific. Based on a detailed description of the event (e.g., who was involved, where and when it happened, and what was the context and sequence of events).

As a result of going through this process, "John is always late," turns into, "John was late for the leadership meeting three times last week." This helps avoid emotions and exaggerations, as well as the disagreements that come when someone naturally tries to defend their behavior.

4. Put On Your Coaching Hat

Benji Rabhan

Benji Rabhan, founder of AppointmentCore

When I'm about to give feedback, I put on my coach hat. Here's what I do:

Strike while the iron is cold. To be effective, I must wait until I have emotionally separated myself from the equation. This way, I can proceed calmly and collectively, so as to not engage the employee's fight or flight reflex.

Ask for permission. Once we sit down together, I say, "I'm going to wear the coaching hat as we talk about the project. Is that okay?" With their agreement, I explain, "There's been something I've been trying to figure out, and I need your help. I am betting there is something I did not tell you, or there is a difference between our past experiences in this area. Do you mind if I ask you a few questions to see if we can figure out what I'm missing?" Doing this sets the context of the discussion as mutual improvement and prevents defensiveness.

Challenge assumptions with open-ended questions. I ask questions to help me understand their process for creating the work. Rather than ask, "Did you know that you did this wrong?" I'll say, "Tell me about how you went about this assignment." As they're sharing, I'll ask follow-up questions such as "What was the thought process of why you did it that way?" I keep going until I run out of questions. Open-ended questions help me discover what went wrong on the assignment, and how to correct the missteps. They also help the employee see the gaps in their own logic without me even having to say anything. And sometimes, I realize that I'm the one with the gap or that we both are.

In the end, I believe the key to making the process work is a sincere curiosity and desire to:

  • Understand what you personally could do better.

  • Get to the root of the problem.
  • Help the other person solve their own challenges in a peaceful way.
  • I recommend the book, Nonviolent Communication. It details great processes for having difficult conversations without sparking negativity.

    5. Forget Motivation. Stop Demotivating.

    Sevetri Wilson

    Sevetri Wilson, CEO of Solid Ground Innovations

    I am a very "straight to the point" person, and I've learned the hard way that this can really hurt morale.

    Constant criticism, without an environment that praises great work, leads to employees becoming demotivated because they feel like they can never be 'good enough.' In a study that surveyed 1.2 million employees at primarily Fortune 1000 companies, they found that employees often don't need motivation. It is constant critique without recognition that causes them to be demotivated.

    When I give constructive criticism, I always emphasize that I believe in the person and their work. If I didn't, I wouldn't have hired them. I make it a point to let my team members know that I'm fully aware of their capabilities, and I won't accept anything less. I try to transform the conversation's energy into something constructive by reminding them of what I loved about their other more successful projects and work. Whether that's creativity, attention to detail, or content, it's important to get people to dig deep down and pull out the work that made me hire them in the first place.

    6. Give The Conversation Over To The Employee

    Brian Scudamore

    Brian Scudamore, founder and CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK?, You Move Me, and Wow 1 Day Painting

    My approach is to turn the conversation over to employees to lead - and hopefully - resolve.

    I start by asking "How do you feel about your work?" or "Is this your best?"

    Then my role becomes, "How can I help you?"

    This leads to more employee ownership over problems and solutions. By taking myself out of the equation, I avoid negative feelings, but more importantly I believe the team grows and becomes capable of solving even greater challenges on their own.

    Ultimately, this has led to a culture where our team looks forward to getting negative feedback because they know they will benefit from it. This mirrors the approach taken by Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla Motors, who proactively seeks out and listens to negative feedback.

    7. Be Tough-Minded On Standards And Tender-Hearted With People

    Doug Conant

    Doug Conant, former CEO of Fortune 500 company Campbell Soup Company and founder and CEO of Conant Leadership

    When I give feedback, I often start with the four magic words of leadership, "How can I help?" Next, I ask additional questions to get to the root challenge. For example, "What can we do better?"

    By asking these questions with sincerity, commitment, and a desire to help, leaders can be tough-minded on standards and tender-hearted with people. Most people unnecessarily sacrifice one for the other, but it is imperative that leaders incorporate both in a meaningful way, if they hope to achieve sustainable high performance.

    The power of this approach is that it:

    • Sets the purpose of the conversation as solving the problem, not attacking the person.

    • Positions myself as a resource rather than a combatant.

    • Empowers the person to productively work through the issue.

    8. Sandwich Your Feedback And Spread It Out

    Cameron Herold

    Cameron Herold, author of Double Double, CEO coach, and globally renowned speaker

    I "sandwich" the constructive criticism inside the good stuff and spread it out throughout the day:

    • Tell them what they're doing well.

    • Tell them what specifically needs to improve.

    • Tell them something else they're doing well.

    I learned this 30 years ago in the One Minute Manager, and it still holds up today. It's also a great way to raise kids too - and I have four. Here's why it works:

    It is crucial to give MORE positive feedback than negative feedback. According to one study, top performing teams give each other more than five positive comments for every negative one.

    It is crucial to give feedback immediately. Stanford University researcher on behavioral change, BJ Fogg, shares, "It's critical for people to give feedback during or immediately after the behavior so that people's brains will wire it correctly." In other words, the tighter the feedback loop, the more immediately that feedback can be incorporated into and influence future behavior. How much more slowly would your golf swing improve if someone told you to 'square your shoulders' a week after a practice session vs. after your first few swings?

    9. Direct Your Passion To Competitors And Your Heart Toward Employees

    Aaron Steed

    Aaron Steed, CEO of Meathead Movers

    We all have passion and heart about our businesses. That passion is critical for the success of the company. It's good for employees to see. However, the mistake that many founders make is directing that energy negatively toward employees with harsh feedback that employees can't help but take personally.

    The goal isn't to kill the passion; it's to redirect it.

    When giving feedback, I direct my passion toward competitors, and my heart toward employees. When I do this, meetings turn from defensive to inspirational. Here's how I do it:

    I set my default to always come from a place of love, gratitude and curiosity (LGC).

    I write "LGC" on the top of my personal, printed meeting agenda, if I'm stepping into a serious meeting. This helps me focus on why LGC is important. Our environment unconsciously triggers certain emotions. One study even found that holding a warm cup of coffee can increase the odds of us being more warm to others.

    10. Show a Funny Video Before Giving Feedback

    Kay Koplovitz

    Kay Koplovitz, founder, USA Network and Syfy

    A great way to relax someone is to find a cartoon, funny video or something else of interest to share to help the person let down their defensive guard. From there, it is easier to direct conversation to why their performance was subpar, and how to improve.

    Beyond the immediate impact on everyone's mood, laughter has long-term health benefits as well. And it may not only help the person you're giving feedback to! It may help you. If you're resisting confronting a lackluster performance, keep in mind a fascinating study, which found watching comedy videos increases willpower!

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    Special thank you to Ian Chew and Luke Murray for being an integral part of putting this article together.