THE BLOG

Skiing

12/30/2010 01:39 pm ET | Updated May 25, 2011

The Evil Spawn likes a lot of things.

Sleep. Books. Video games. Basketball. Chocolate. Not doing chores in a prompt and timely fashion.

And she likes to ski (as you can see from the video).

If you have been paying attention you know she's nine years old (going on 35).

She's been skiing since she was five (we question our parental judgment for allowing her to slide down the side of a mountain at 107 miles an hour before she completed kindergarten).

Since she started skiing so young, it came quite easily to her.

I didn't start trying to injure myself on the slopes until I was 37 (which sounds old... but seems quite youthful to me 6 years later).

Even though I'm stronger and more athletic (my opinion, not hers), she's a better skier.

And even worse, you can watch her and tell she has a lot of room to improve.

In the next few years, she will only get better.

I, on the other hand, will only get older.

My skiing skills have probably peaked (get it, peaked... mountains... never mind).

How is this possible?

How can someone younger and weaker be so much better?

I was thinking about this as I laid in the snow after smacking my face on the side of the half pipe.

Young people catch on to new skills quicker than old people (see: technology).

Genius.

At least it seemed like genius, as I tried to pick up my pride after my latest crash.

Once my head cleared (days later), this got me thinking about how we teach foreign language in school (don't try to figure out how my mind jumps from one thing to the next).

Why don't we teach first graders a second language while they are young?

And eager.

And unafraid.

Why do we wait until they are older and their reflexes aren't as sharp?

Sorry, I don't know if I'm talking about learning a second language or skiing.

I may still be in a fog.

Sadly, I used her Flip Cam to make the video. She had to show me how to turn it on (and this was pre-head injury).