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Mike Ghouse

Mike Ghouse

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French Burqa Ban Sets a Dangerous Precedent

Posted: 04/14/11 11:04 AM ET

The ban takes France back into darkness when women were considered a chattel, a property of men to be used any way they can.

Osama Bin Laden and his ilk force women to wear the burqa at gun point, whereas the French President is forcing women not to wear it. Are women a play thing for these men?

Sustainable cultural change can come only though free will and not compulsion. I am not for the burqa and most Muslims are not either. But we have to defend the woman's right to wear what she chooses. We must uphold the liberties of people and not force women to do anything against their will -- to make them wear the burqa or force them not to wear. We have to be pro-choice.

Burqa is not a religious requirement but a cultural evolvement and is a part of the daily lives of nearly 5 percent of Muslims in France and about 20 percent across the globe. You cannot ask a nun to wear lesser garments or even those who are from conservative families to wear bikinis on the beaches. An Indian woman visiting France will not and should not comply with the demands of the French dress code in public places.

Is the French public drawing devious pleasure in reducing Muslim women to obey the laws under the guise of security? The world is silently witnessing evil in making. Aren't we ashamed of our silence during the Holocaust? Sarkozy is setting a dangerous precedent in the world. What if other nations decide to go back to medieval times in robbing the liberties of the people for their own games?

Women have come a long way forward to find freedom from primates. Are we going to let Neanderthal Sarkozy reset the clock? Who is he to tell a woman what to eat, drink, wear and believe?

I hope all French women wear the burqa one day to protect the liberties of the ones in danger. It is the wrong law to have passed, and we cannot have such evil laws on our books.

First they came for burqas and I did not care,
I did not wear the burqa;

They came for turbans and I did not care,
I did not wear the turban;

They came for the kippah and I did not care,
I was not Jewish;

They also came for the cross and I did not care,
I was not a Christian;

Then they came for English and I did not care,
I did not speak English;

Then the came for me and I panicked,
there was no one for me.

To bring about any cultural change in a given society, it has to be done through free will, particularly if it is not hurting or affecting others. Women have been wearing the burqa in France for a very long time and they should continue to wear if that gives them a sense of comfort, it is even more important today given the prevalent prejudices; we should not aggravate but mitigate it to build a cohesive society.

 

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