SPONSORED BY PWC
07/22/2016 03:17 pm ET | Updated Jul 25, 2016

Why We're Making Beer Out Of That 'Dirty Water'

You've tried fewer toilet flushes. You've spent less time watering your lawn. But have you tried guzzling a favorite beer made from your local river? We think you should.

The numbers are staggering. In 2013, private industry was responsible for 65% of all fresh water withdrawals in the United States, compared to only 8% from use in our homes. As our global population continues to surge, and with it the increase in life quality and the high demand for consumer products -- so many of which require water -- the demand for fresh water is increasing as well. To meet that demand, we want you to reimagine the future of water -- by using and reusing our water more efficiently and exploring new ways to put non-conventional water sources to work.

In Boston, we know all about that "Dirty Water", and while the beloved Charles River has made dramatic improvements to its cleanliness in recent years through the work of many dedicated advocates, you still wouldn't want to be tossing back bottles of it at a summer BBQ. So this year, to make some noise about this important issue while doling out pints to Boston's thirsty masses, Desalitech, global leaders in water purification and reuse, is partnering with HUBweek, a weeklong celebration of creativity and innovation in Boston, to create the first ever "Brew the Charles" competition.

In a few weeks time, we'll be headed to the banks of the Charles to pull out a truckload of Charles River water, purify it through one of our high reliability high efficiency systems that uses the latest technology based on a process known as reverse osmosis, and then deliver it to six of the Bay State's finest brewers who will work over the coming weeks to make the best brew they can out of Charles River water. They'll then compete for the title of the first annual "Brew the Charles" champion - to be crowned on September 30th during HUBweek at an event where the public can declare who brewed the Charles the best. Stepping up to the challenge include Sam Adams from the Boston Beer Company, Harpoon Brewery, Cape Ann Brewing Company, Castle Island Brewing Company, Idle Hands Craft Ales, and Ipswich Ale Brewery.

The urgency of this challenge also presents an opportunity - through major new breakthroughs in reverse osmosis, industrial factories, power plants, farms and municipalities can now substantially improve the efficiency of their water use, and even more importantly reuse wastewater and other dirty water sources with much greater reliability and efficiency. And that's why we're so excited about "Brew the Charles" - it's a chance to make some real good beer, and remind us all that is within our power to reimagine the future of water in the United States and across the globe. Tickets are now on sale, and a percentage of all proceeds will go to the good people of the Charles River Conservancy to keep our river clean. May the best brewer win!

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