If DACA Works, Why Not Implement DAPA?

05/03/2015 02:52 pm ET | Updated May 03, 2016


By Yamid A. Macias and Janet Hernandez, NCLR

Carla Mena, a young aspiring American living in Raleigh, North Carolina, who received Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in 2012, continues to be a committed and engaged member of her community. She is a sitting member of the Wake Health Services Board of Trustees and spends most of her spare time empowering youth through her work on the Youth Council at El Pueblo, Inc. This NCLR Affiliate taught Carla about the importance of helping Latinos achieve positive social change by building consciousness, capacity, and community action, a belief that has been part of their mission for over 20 years. 2015-05-03-1430678843-7777363-LAD_CarlaMena.png

Most recently, thanks to her hard work and determination, Carla was promoted to Bilingual Project Coordinator, a full-time position at Duke University's Global Health Institute. Now that she is a permanent employee, Carla enjoys an array of benefits including, among others, health insurance and a well-deserved salary increase. With these benefits, she can not only increase monetary contributions to her family but also contribute more to the local economy. These opportunities, however, wouldn't have been possible had it not been for her new status resulting from DACA.

Carla recalls that she first learned about DACA on June 15, 2012. This date had a special significance to her and her family, as it marked the 10th anniversary of their arrival to the United States. "I had recently graduated from college, and learning about this opportunity was a relief," she said. "The first question I had was, when can I apply? My family and I hugged and cried from the emotion and the opportunity that this represented."

Today those memories are bittersweet, particularly because Carla fears that her parents -- as well as thousands of other parents in the same situation -- cannot join her in living the American Dream.

Although Carla's story represents the reality that hundreds of thousands of young DACA recipients currently face, it also corroborates an undeniable fact: DACA works. This program's effectiveness suggests that the implementation of Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) could have an even greater impact on our country's economy and workforce.

DAPA would provide opportunities for millions of skilled immigrants to work in fields where they can earn and contribute more. If DACA recipients have demonstrated in just three years what this program can do for communities like Raleigh, perhaps it's time to consider something more stable. As Carla puts it, "Temporary programs are helpful, but a more permanent and more inclusive solution could be better." Carla's story attests to the social and economic benefits of administrative relief, however, the overhaul of our immigration policies remain a critical task that congress must undertake.

This was first posted to the NCLR Blog.