THE BLOG

Living the American DREAM: Ana Angeles

04/02/2015 04:10 pm ET | Updated Jun 02, 2015

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By David Castillo, New Media Manager, NCLR

Activism can take on many forms. For some, it takes the form of community organizing or leading demonstrations. For others, that activism might take place online or at the voting booth. For Ana Angeles, a 30-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient from Orange County, California, that activism has taken place in her home, assisting would-be DACA recipients with their applications. It's something she has taken great pride in doing. While she never set out to serve as an advocate, it was during the experience of applying for DACA that she realized she had something to offer her community.

Ana has lived in the United States since she was 11. Her parents both left jobs at a university in Mexico in search of better lives for Ana and her younger sister.

As a student in the United States, Ana flourished. Indeed, as an outstanding member of the TEACH Academy, a high school program that preps future teachers, she was eligible to apply for a full scholarship to Vanguard University, a private Christian institution.

Ana ultimately graduated with a degree in business and with minors in math, religion, and accounting. She was excited to begin her career, but like so many young people in her position, she had to put those dreams on hold because of her immigration status. While she searched for a job, economic realities soon set in, and she was forced to take one at a fast food joint. This would go on until the president announced the creation of the DACA program.

Since receiving DACA two years ago, Ana has found work at a local education company as a program manager. It was a promotion from the community marketer position she had before. Having DACA made her eligible for the more substantive, full-time position.

Ana's willingness to help others navigate the DACA application process, which requires preparation, is what makes her advocacy so remarkable. She is very busy and has always assumed great responsibility as the oldest of her two other siblings. When she started her own application process, she was appalled at the huge fees many lawyers were asking for as payment to assist with applying. Convinced that these lawyers were just taking advantage, Ana decided she would save her money and apply by herself. Through diligent research and organization, her dedication and commitment paid off eight months later.

In the two years since receiving DACA, Ana has helped friends and family successfully navigate the process, but like many advocates, she still asks herself what else she can do. It's a question that has come up a lot as her renewal period approaches. Ana is still figuring out how to answer that question, but whatever the answer is, her future certainly looks bright and includes the pursuit of an advanced degree.

In the meantime, Ana has a message for those in Congress who seek to undo DACA: "All we want to do is the right thing, to work, and to contribute. I love this country and all that it has given me. Just give us the chance to show you."

This was first posted to the NCLR Blog.