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African American History

It's Called "Battered Race Syndrome." Or, Something Like That

Imani Michelle Scott, Ph.D. | Posted 08.26.2016 | Black Voices
Imani Michelle Scott, Ph.D.

We are ridiculed for being angry We are pressured to quietly pacify our pain We are mocked for feeling victimized We are urged to 'forgive' in the fac...

Soledad O'Brien Helped Me Understand The History Of Race In America

Elizabeth Barnett | Posted 07.19.2016 | Politics
Elizabeth Barnett

Race is socially constructed, but because people have believed things for so long they are unaware of that. In this video, Soledad O'Brien shares stories of growing up biracial. She helps to elaborate on what actually happened in American history.

Why We Must Continue to Revisit Slavery

Andra Gillespie | Posted 06.06.2016 | Black Voices
Andra Gillespie

I admit, I was a little skeptical about the Roots remake when I first heard about it. I love the original series, and I wondered whether a rebooted R...

It is Important to Have Black Faces on Dollars, but More Important to Get Dollars in Black Hands

Dedrick Muhammad | Posted 05.04.2016 | Black Voices
Dedrick Muhammad

Today in the United States, racial economic inequality persists because of the failure of will to invest in people of color, who continue to pay the price for a 21st century economy built off of the white supremacy of the 19th and 20th centuries. It

Aisha Tyler Isn't Afraid to Dig Deep on Season Premiere of 'Who Do You Think You Are?'

Megan Smolenyak | Posted 04.01.2016 | Entertainment
Megan Smolenyak

video preview of Aisha Tyler's Who Do You Think You Are? episode Like so many, I'm delighted that Aisha Tyler (actress, comedian, host (The Talk, Who...

The Resurgence of New Afrikan Identity

Johnny L. Ricks | Posted 03.18.2016 | Black Voices
Johnny L. Ricks

I am not colored, Negro, Afro-American, African-American, nor any other identifying appellation or abstract term historically imposed upon me. Nor ar...

My Father's Silence - A Personal Account of Trauma and its Origins

Thomas Reissmann | Posted 03.08.2016 | Black Voices
Thomas Reissmann

My Father's Silence is the true story of Houston resident Hitaji Aziz, who tells her story in the documentary Adversity and the Art of Happiness. It reflects the epigenetics of a family and the humanity of all families.

History For All: Two Novels Based on American Life

Janet Mason | Posted 03.01.2016 | Books
Janet Mason

My partner and I, over breakfast, were discussing what a leap year is. The only consensus that we were able to come to was that time is an artificial...

Race

Dwight Brown | Posted 02.19.2016 | Entertainment
Dwight Brown

"On the track, there is no black and white, just fast and slow. For those 10 seconds you are free," says Jesse Owens (Stephan James) in this moving an...

The Conversation About Race Is Missing the Larger Issue

Sheril Antonio | Posted 11.18.2016 | Black Voices
Sheril Antonio

Even when we earnestly discuss race, usually in the context of yet another revelatory event, we are still avoiding the larger issue, which is rooted in the profound lack of education and consistent access to a complete version of our country's history.

Yes, African-Americans Can Claim Africa Too

Shamira Muhammad | Posted 09.09.2016 | Black Voices
Shamira Muhammad

If we were to examine African ethos, a huge factor in its existence relies upon a person's strides to reflect and remember where they came from, so that it can constantly be built upon in cultural meaning making. To remember is to practice a sacred rite. To forget or dismiss this is to sin.

Hurricane Katrina's Struggling Black Gay Community

Irene Monroe | Posted 09.02.2016 | Queer Voices
Irene Monroe

The hurricane exposed not only race and class fault lines, but the odious fault lines of heterosexism and faith-based privilege. LGBTQ evacuees, many of whom are now displaced, faced all kinds of discrimination at the hands of many of the faith-based relief agencies.

Jacob Lawrence Migration Series at MOMA

Brian D. Cohen | Posted 08.21.2016 | Arts
Brian D. Cohen

At age 23 Jacob Lawrence undertook this encompassing and ambitious series. The tradition of narrative history painting, the highest ideal of European painting since Giotto, but largely dormant since the early 1800's, had been revived in the contemporary mural cycles of Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco.

Music History: James Brown at the Apollo Theater

National Trust for Historic Preservation | Posted 07.30.2016 | Arts
National Trust for Historic Preservation

From jazz and blues to R&B and Motown, from plays to comedians and from Amateur Night to Showtime at the Apollo, the theater has been among the most important cultural and entertainment institutions for not only the African-American community, but the world.

Ending Apathy from African-American Entertainers

Cierra Lockett | Posted 07.28.2016 | Black Voices
Cierra Lockett

As we move forward as a people, it is important that those with power and platforms remember to not only entertain the community, but to enlighten and empower those in it; not only with their art, but with their actions.

Hate Symbols Are Barriers to Progress

Iván Espinoza-Madrigal | Posted 06.25.2016 | Latino Voices
Iván Espinoza-Madrigal

Preserving a symbol of slavery and black subjugation sends a threatening and terrifying message that black lives -- and the lives of other oppressed individuals -- do not matter.

Author Beverly Jenkins' Romance With the Past

National Trust for Historic Preservation | Posted 05.08.2016 | Black Voices
National Trust for Historic Preservation

Thirty-one books later, Jenkins is known for introducing readers to little known histories of African-Americans in the 19th century, amid tales of complicated and strong heroines and the men who they grow to love.

I Found My Blackness: I Didn't Know It Was Missing Until It Came Back

Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson | Posted 05.04.2016 | Black Voices
Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson

During my childhood I was aware that I was different in color from the majority of people around me, but my father and mother emphasized brainpower, not color. Color was what you were, but not using your brain was a choice.

Five Historic Sites with Fresh Perspectives on Interpreting Slavery and Freedom

National Trust for Historic Preservation | Posted 06.30.2015 | Education
National Trust for Historic Preservation

Using different approaches, all of the five sites work to spark a dialogue that will lead to understanding and reconciliation.

Alvin Ailey at the Auditorium Theater - The Celebration Continues

Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson | Posted 06.14.2015 | Arts
Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson

The 125 Anniversary celebration of Chicago's illustrious Auditorium Theater continued last month with a two-week residency of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. And boy was I ready.

Strengthening the Connections Between African Americans and National Parks

Michael Sainato | Posted 05.27.2015 | Black Voices
Michael Sainato

The arches of Yellowstone National Park at the park entrance displays the Theodore Roosevelt quote, "for the benefit and enjoyment of the people." Despite Roosevelt's rhetoric, the national parks' missions have lacked focus towards African Americans for decades.

Rocka My Soul

Robert Koehler | Posted 05.19.2015 | Entertainment
Robert Koehler

This great inner wanting yearned for a freedom we don't much talk about these days, in our relative affluence and comfort, but the music and the movement of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, with its roots in Africa, in Gospel revival -- in growing up black in America -- went so much deeper than that.

White Terrorism

Robert Koehler | Posted 05.05.2015 | Politics
Robert Koehler

The president doesn't "love" America? Would that it were true. Would that the president felt a responsibility to the global future and, at the same time, could summon our real past, grieve for its victims and vow with every fiber of his being to atone for our history of slavery and conquest: the "white terrorism" of manifest destiny. Would that the president didn't "love" our myths.

Natchez, Mississippi Up Close

Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson | Posted 05.02.2015 | Travel
Regina Fraser and Pat Johnson

I looked forward to my first visit to Mississippi. During decades of travel across the USA, I have covered much of the South, but had not wandered through or made any forays into the great State of Mississippi.

10 Must-See Black Landmarks At Your Fingertips

The Huffington Post | Jessica Dickerson | Posted 02.27.2015 | Black Voices

Google Maps can do so much more than just getting you to the nearest gas station. For lovers of Black History Month, the innovative platform can a...