iOS app Android app

Agitation

Cussin'? Outbursts? Answers and Relief Here

AlzLIVE | Posted 03.08.2015 | Fifty
AlzLIVE

People living with Alzheimer's and dementia can exhibit a broad range of responsive behaviors, such as wandering, verbal repetition, sexual behavior or angry outbursts. For caregivers, dealing with responsive behaviors can be a frustrating and exhausting task. But there are answers.

Stressed or Blessed? 60 Seconds or Less Can Be the Dealbreaker

Millie Grenough | Posted 09.05.2014 | Healthy Living
Millie Grenough

You know how it goes. Something hits you wrong and you fly off the handle. Just like that. Yesterday morning I was absorbed in to-do details yakking ...

The Little-Known Aging Illness That Needs More Awareness

Candy Schulman | Posted 08.19.2014 | Fifty
Candy Schulman

When the legendary radio personality Casey Kasem died, his obituary said he'd suffered from Lewy Body disease. 'Lewy-what?' most people wondered. But I knew first-hand, watching my mother decline from this little-known, but most common, type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer's.

Alzheimer's Caregivers: 3 Tips for Restoring Harmony to Your Relationship With Your Loved One

Marie Marley | Posted 06.21.2014 | Fifty
Marie Marley

"I can't promise following this advice will stop all the fights," she said. "But it'll help. Why don't you try it for a while and see what happens?"

Why Alzheimer's Caregiving and Pride Don't Mix

Marie Marley | Posted 11.03.2013 | Fifty
Marie Marley

You can't win an argument with a person who has Alzheimer's. Agree with whatever he says -- no matter how absurd -- unless there's a compelling reason not to, and there rarely is.

5 Ways To Deal With A Loved One's Embarrassing Behavior In Public

Marie Marley | Posted 06.30.2013 | Fifty
Marie Marley

It isn't unusual for people with Alzheimer's to behave inappropriately in public at times. And often that leads to embarrassment for the caregiver. Here are some ways to deal with that embarrassment.

Who Suffers More: Alzheimer's Patients or Their Caregivers?

Marie Marley | Posted 04.28.2012 | Healthy Living
Marie Marley

To help reduce your distress the next time your loved one is distressed, try to remain aware that people with dementia live only in the present. That way you can end your suffering as quickly as your loved one does, and then you can both move on to something more pleasant.