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American Civil War

At the University of Texas, Echoes of its Confederate Past Reverberate in the Present

Travis Knoll | Posted 05.22.2015 | College
Travis Knoll

Instead of promoting outdated values, the University should vigorously reeducate its students, if not by removing the statues, at least rededicating the them in a way as to tell the story of the tragedy of needless blood spilled, not of a "glorious past" that existed only in the minds of those who refused to let go.

The Civil War's Forgotten Battlefield

Mark Yzaguirre | Posted 05.04.2015 | Travel
Mark Yzaguirre

In many ways, the Battle of Palmito Ranch was a minor battle over the much larger issues that would define the political terms in North America in the middle of the 19th Century.

Civil War at 150: Appomattox Was Not the End

William Bradley | Posted 04.09.2015 | Politics
William Bradley

"There was a great humorless arrogance about him, for he had never been blessed with a moment of self-doubt. He liked to say that he was in morals, no...

My Conversation on the Legacy of the Civil War, 150 Years Later

Tavis Smiley | Posted 04.09.2015 | TV
Tavis Smiley

I'm joined by Daina Ramey Berry, Eric Walther, and Allyson Hobbs, three scholars of American history, to unpack the causes and consequences -- both immediate and enduring -- of the deadliest war in U.S. history. In the clip the panel reflects on the period of Reconstruction immediately following the war, and on the incompleteness of a landless emancipation.

A Century of Progress

Marcel Pacatte | Posted 04.06.2015 | Chicago
Marcel Pacatte

Ever hear of Oscar DePriest? He made history a hundred years ago Monday. Few today remember him, but a hundred years ago, on April 6, 1915, Oscar DePriest made history, becoming the first African-American elected alderman in Chicago.

'Do You See What I See': The Debate Over Black Confederates

Jim Downs | Posted 03.25.2015 | College
Jim Downs

Doing black history means more than just finding black people in the archives and stating whether they did or did not do something.

Thanksgiving and Civil War

Honor Sachs | Posted 01.28.2015 | Politics
Honor Sachs

Few ever stop to think why we celebrate this moment. When you think about it, it does not make a lot of sense. We have a national holiday to celebrate an obscure dinner party that took place almost four hundred years ago. Why? How did this come to be?

RIGHT NEXT DOOR: Dane Elliott Lewis, Civil War Reinactor

Ian Spanier | Posted 01.26.2015 | Los Angeles
Ian Spanier

Lewis grew up as one of just a handful of African-Americans in a small town along the Hudson River in Westchester County, New York. He really began ...

Maryland's Emancipation and the Homecoming of Frederick Douglass

Paul Kendrick | Posted 01.20.2015 | Books
Paul Kendrick

Frederick Douglass had escaped slavery 26 years before, but when Maryland ended slavery, it took him only 16 days to return to Baltimore.

Suzan-Lori Parks Returns From the Wars Triumphant

Steven Suskin | Posted 12.28.2014 | Arts
Steven Suskin

There is enough in the characters and the dialogue -- even in the costumes, with some actors drifting on wearing basketball sneakers -- to tell us that Father Comes Home is a play of ideas and freedom that directly speaks to us, here in the 21st century.

An All-But-Forgotten American Hero

Jamie Malanowski | Posted 12.28.2014 | Books
Jamie Malanowski

October 28 marks the 150th anniversary of what may well be the greatest individual feat of arms in American history.

Frederick Douglass Meets the Queen (a historical fiction)

Van Gosse | Posted 12.01.2014 | Black Voices
Van Gosse

Douglass shook the Prince's hand and looked at him directly, knowing that what interested Albert was his refusal of servility.

Confederate's Gravestone Has Wrong Name, Won't Be Fixed

AP | Posted 09.30.2014 | Politics

ELMIRA, N.Y. (AP) — A descendant of a Confederate soldier who died in a Civil War prison camp in New York says the wrong name is on his gravestone, ...

In 1864 Maryland, Confusion Over Emancipaton Made Slaves Interpreters of Law

Martha S. Jones | Posted 10.25.2014 | Black Voices
Martha S. Jones

In the midst of the Civil War, who was a slave and who was free? When African Americans in Maryland asked this question 150 years ago, in August 1864, they engaged in a sophisticated analysis.

California's Forgotten Civil War

Kevin Waite | Posted 09.06.2014 | Politics
Kevin Waite

The tragedy of slavery and the trauma of the Civil War have left legacies with which all Americans, from coast to coast and everywhere in between, continue to live.

What My Grandfather Taught Me About Strategy

The University of Central Florida Forum | Posted 08.12.2014 | College
The University of Central Florida Forum

My grandfather was also a naval officer, Class of 1922, U.S. Naval Academy. I became a fan of naval strategy thanks to him. To paraphrase Mark Twain: I learned how much my grandfather knew long after he taught me many life lessons.

When It Comes to America's Veterans' Crisis, "Thank You For Your Service" Is Not Enough

Rep. Jim McDermott | Posted 07.28.2014 | Politics
Rep. Jim McDermott

Many veterans are desperate to talk about their experiences with fellow Americans who accept shared responsibility for what is done in war, particularly the killing. Yet these conversations rarely happen today.

Forgetting to Remember: Racial Inequality and Mythmaking on Memorial Day

Jennifer Wheeler | Posted 07.25.2014 | Politics
Jennifer Wheeler

For 150 years, since the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in Confederate states, we have relied upon the conveniences of selective memory and mythmaking to imagine a more united, United States.

Military Moms of the Civil War

Erin Lindsay McCabe | Posted 07.07.2014 | Women
Erin Lindsay McCabe

I was shocked when I learned that during the Civil War, over 200 women served as soldiers all while disguised as men. From the moment I learned of them, I have admired those women immensely. But once I gave birth to my son in 2011, I was struck by overwhelming respect and amazement for the six documented women who did all that and did it while pregnant.

150 Years Since Ulysses S. Grant's Superstition Won a War

Jonathan Hobratsch | Posted 07.02.2014 | Politics
Jonathan Hobratsch

The Overland campaign was one of the most decisive campaigns in American history on the 150th anniversary.

The Untold Story of Civil-Rights Progress in the U.S.: An Interview With Author Clay Risen

Steve Kettmann | Posted 06.09.2014 | Books
Steve Kettmann

In many ways, the bizarre state of affairs in which our nation's capital now finds itself mired is not so new. Author Clay Risen explores a key juncture in our history when archaic procedures threatened to change the course of history.

She Went Into Battle: Female Soldiers in the U.S. Military

Erin Lindsay McCabe | Posted 04.27.2014 | Women
Erin Lindsay McCabe

What I really want is for women to be part of the story from the outset, and for the world to know that they've been there all along. It's been a long time coming, for women to openly serve, but it's also part of a deep-seated tradition in this country.

Women Who Fought for Love

Erin Lindsay McCabe | Posted 04.13.2014 | Women
Erin Lindsay McCabe

It surprises many people to learn that over 200 women disguised themselves as men and fought in the Civil War. While serving in the military certainly doesn't seem like a romantic honeymoon, several sets of newlyweds served together as soldiers.

Reading Without Understanding -- Common Core Versus Abraham Lincoln

Alan Singer | Posted 01.25.2014 | Politics
Alan Singer

When Common Core ignores the context behind the Gettysburg Address, it does students, Americans, and Abraham Lincoln a great disservice.

Just 23 Percent Of Americans Think Abraham Lincoln Would Be A Republican Today

The Huffington Post | Ariel Edwards-Levy | Posted 11.19.2013 | Politics

The 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address has given rise to plenty of conjecture about how it might play in modern times. We've already speculat...