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My Journey After Testing Positive For The BRCA Cancer Gene Mutation

Holly Sidell | Posted 09.26.2016 | Women
Holly Sidell

All of these women are incredible fighters and survivors. And I don't think I'm brave like them. I don't believe I could go through it and be as courageous as they are.

Why you should worry about the privatization of genetic data

The Conversation US | Posted 09.08.2016 | Healthy Living
The Conversation US

By Kayte Spector-Bagdady, University of Michigan President Obama has promised to support a bold future for medicine where diagnostic testing and trea...

Why You Should Probably Talk to Your Great Aunt About the BRCA Gene

Emma Ambrogi | Posted 05.23.2016 | Healthy Living
Emma Ambrogi

BRCA mutations in your family might not be evident if you have information only for direct ancestors-- your parents and grandparents. Stronger evidence requires communication among branches of the family to establish a more complete picture.

The Test That Could Have Saved My Sister-In-Law's Life

Rachel Lanman | Posted 05.19.2016 | Healthy Living
Rachel Lanman

My sister-in-law didn't get tested for BRCA until she already had cancer. Since it spread so quickly, it was already too late for her. If only one person meets with a genetic counselor because of this blog post, I'll know it was worth writing.

A Family Health Portrait

Judith A. Salerno | Posted 05.04.2016 | Impact
Judith A. Salerno

Ask yourself, do you know -- completely and accurately -- your family's health history? Have you looked into those specific diseases that affected your mother, father, aunt or uncle? Have you considered how their experiences may apply to you now and in the future?

My Ovaries Are Off the Table

Caitlin Brodnick | Posted 04.15.2017 | Women
Caitlin Brodnick

I am more than happy to let them feel my new fake boobies and I'll share my intimate details, but my ovaries just aren't up for discussion. Not yet. I understand my boundaries might be confusing to others, but they're mine.

Women Who Wrote, and Will Write, History

Judith A. Salerno | Posted 03.15.2017 | Impact
Judith A. Salerno

It's an honor to celebrate these women and countless others this month - the 28th annual Women's History month - who uncompromisingly pursued their passions and dreams, often in the face of criticism, stereotypes and stigma.

David Bowie and a National Call to Cure Cancer

Allison Gilbert | Posted 01.19.2017 | Healthy Living
Allison Gilbert

This week has been full of the stories that reverberate through social media. First David Bowie succumbed to cancer, then just a few days later, Alan ...

Dangers of New ACS Mammography Guidelines: Underestimated Risk and Delayed Diagnoses

Marisa Weiss, M.D. | Posted 10.21.2016 | Healthy Living
Marisa Weiss, M.D.

The assumption that we can accurately identify who is just at average risk of breast cancer is a dangerous default. Risk is complex, poorly understood, and it's often inconsistently assessed over time.

A Call to Action for Women's Medical Rights

Barbara Jacoby | Posted 05.26.2016 | Healthy Living
Barbara Jacoby

As a two-time breast cancer survivor, I have been carefully watching all of the controversy that has been going on from the testing of young women for...

Is Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Right for You?

Mount Sinai Health System | Posted 05.06.2016 | Healthy Living
Mount Sinai Health System

While it's natural to wonder if you might have inherited an abnormal BRCA gene from one of your parents, it's also important to remember that the overwhelming majority of women with breast cancer have no family history of the disease. That's why genetic testing is recommended only for people whose family history or other factors suggest the presence of a gene mutation.

I've Got the BRCA-Positive Mutation Gene -- How Do I Interpret My Hereditary Risk for Getting Breast and/or Ovarian Cancer?

Sharlene Hesse-Biber | Posted 06.27.2015 | Healthy Living
Sharlene Hesse-Biber

It behooves the medical profession who relate hereditary risk assessment percentages to do so in a way that women can interpret the subjective nature of these data and offer more guidance on just how at risk women should apply these numbers in the context of their own lived experience.

Ask the Mutant: Faceboob -- An Open Letter to Facebook From My Breasts

Eva Moon | Posted 06.17.2015 | Women
Eva Moon

Facebook, with 1.39 billion active users, is the world's de facto forum. As such, it has a responsibility to its users -- at the very least, a responsibility to adhere to its own stated guidelines.

Sizing Up Your Genes

Melanie Young | Posted 05.29.2015 | Healthy Living
Melanie Young

What I appreciate about Angelina Jolie Pitt's candidness about her decisions is that she opens up the conversation and brings women's health issues top of mind. Everyone seems to zero in on breast cancer and not nearly enough people focus on the cancers that can brew "down there."

Angelina Jolie Pitt Empowers Women to Make Health Decisions

Samantha Golkin | Posted 05.26.2015 | Women
Samantha Golkin

These stories have done more than just educate and inspire women to take their lives into their own hands; they have been the catalyst that has ignited and continues to ignite social and governmental change.

Should I Get The BRCA Test?

Elizabeth Chabner Thompson, MD, MPH | Posted 03.18.2015 | Healthy Living
Elizabeth Chabner Thompson, MD, MPH

BRCA testing is done for people with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Last fall, one of my colleagues at BFFL CO discovered that she was BRCA positive. Her mother also tested positive. Naturally, they both had a number of questions for me and for their genetic counselor, so I decided to put together a checklist.

Commercial DNA Testing May Cause Harm, Scientific Studies Show (if You Read Through to the Study Limitations at the End)

Cecile Janssens | Posted 02.21.2015 | Science
Cecile Janssens

"No evidence of harm" is not the same as "evidence of no harm." All studies had serious limitations that may have made the results more positive than justified, which the researchers often acknowledged.

Why I Don't Miss My Breasts Anymore

Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg | Posted 02.17.2015 | Women
Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg

Shortly after my double mastectomy 12 years ago, my oncologist asked me how I felt about losing my breasts. I told him I was sad and afraid I would feel this way forever. "How you feel will keep evolving," he said.

4 Reasons Why I Don't Want To Lose My Breasts

Debra Jenkins | Posted 01.31.2015 | Women
Debra Jenkins

Somehow, I had the impression that an elective mastectomy was different, less invasive than one performed when cancer is present. I convinced myself that the surgery would be more like the cosmetic breast reduction I had four years ago.

Breast Cancer Treatment Decisions: Personal Choice Is Key

Mount Sinai Health System | Posted 01.13.2015 | Healthy Living
Mount Sinai Health System

Barring certain medical factors, however, the patient's preference drives the course of treatment in many cases. It is a personal choice that has significant implications for the patient, as it may affect her appearance, how she feels about her body, and how she thinks of herself as a woman.

Here's What We Learned About Breast Cancer In 2014

The Huffington Post | Anna Almendrala | Posted 10.09.2014 | Healthy Living

It's estimated that 1 in 8 U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer in their lifetimes, and about 40,000 American women are expected to die from...

Not So Simple: The Breast Cancer Stories of Betty Ford and Happy Rockefeller

Barron H. Lerner | Posted 11.26.2014 | Healthy Living
Barron H. Lerner

Just as Betty Ford's survival was not due to early detection, Rockefeller's survival (she turned 88 in June 2014) unlikely resulted from the prophylactic removal of her second breast. Early detection of breast and other cancers remains a complicated and controversial subject.

To Test or Not to Test: A Question Ashkenazi Jewish Women Must Weigh in Light of a New Breast Cancer Study

Marisa Weiss, M.D. | Posted 11.25.2014 | Healthy Living
Marisa Weiss, M.D.

Decisions regarding genetic testing should never be made lightly. The results of these tests can require difficult and life-altering choices, for yourself and your family. Testing should only be done when you can actually use that information to take steps that will have a major positive health or life impact.

Genetic Testing for All Women? Not a Solution to the Breast Cancer Epidemic

Karuna Jaggar | Posted 11.24.2014 | Healthy Living
Karuna Jaggar

Genetic testing is complex, and brings with it a wide range of medical, ethical and scientific issues -- despite years of medical training, even many physicians don't fully understand all the complexity involved.

30 Stars and Doctors Sign the 'Petition for Briggs for Cancer Immunotherapy for All'

Paul Sanderson | Posted 10.06.2014 | Healthy Living
Paul Sanderson

It's time for governments, cancer organizations, and the cancer industry to devote their resources primarily to immunotherapy and give it urgent priority.