iOS app Android app

Charlie Hebdo

Weekend Roundup: Death of the First Global Statesman

Nathan Gardels | Posted 03.27.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

This week, Singapore's founding father, Lee Kuan Yew, died at 91. Though the last remaining of the great figures of post-WWII decolonization, Lee was also the first global statesman. As he himself put it, "when we were pushed out of Malaysia we had no hinterland. So we had to do or die, and the globalization of the world helped us. So we made the world our hinterland." By thinking global, but acting local, Lee was able to vault his small city-state from the Third World to the First World. The WorldPost remembers Lee through his own words from interviews I have done with him over the years. Writing from Singapore, Pranay Gupte focuses on Lee's unique accomplishment of "clean governance." Writing from Beijing, philosopher Daniel A. Bell emphasizes Singapore's meritocratic government as the core of its success with lessons for China. (continued)

Charlie Hebdo To Receive PEN Award

AP | Posted 03.25.2015 | Media

NEW YORK (AP) — Charlie Hebdo, the Parisian satirical magazine that was a target of a deadly shooting in January, will be honored at this spring's P...

Freedom of Expression and Its Double Standard

Aseal Tineh | Posted 03.24.2015 | College
Aseal Tineh

Almost a month ago, the French Club at the University of Chicago invited Charlie Hebdo journalist Zineb El Rhazoui to discuss "freedom of expression in our contemporary society." The event on freedom of expression, however, quickly turned to a kickboxing match with a single kickboxer and Islam as her punching bag.

Read An Excerpt Of Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Latest Book

The Huffington Post | Farah Mohamed | Posted 03.24.2015 | World

In her latest book, Somali-born author and activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali, known for her controversial views on Islam, argues that the religion is not a pea...

Excerpt: Heretic: Why Islam Needs a Reformation Now

Ayaan Hirsi Ali | Posted 03.24.2015 | World
Ayaan Hirsi Ali

In these pages, it is my intention to make many people -- not only Muslims but also Western apologists for Islam -- uncomfortable. I am not going to do this by drawing cartoons. Rather, I intend to challenge centuries of religious orthodoxy with ideas and arguments that I am certain will be denounced as heretical. My argument is for nothing less than a Muslim Reformation.

Weekend Roundup: The Politics of Polarization Always Ends Badly

Nathan Gardels | Posted 03.21.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

Whether in Russia, Venezuela or Israel, the ugly politics of polarization may work in winning elections -- but it always ends badly. Netanyahu's scaremongering against Arab voters and dashing of a two-state solution (his bad faith post-election backtrack notwithstanding) dispels two long-held illusions at once: that Israeli democracy would be inclusive or that Palestinians would have their own state. If there is no room for Palestinians anywhere, then what? In an exclusive interview with the Huffington Post, (full interview to be released Saturday), U.S. President Barack Obama addresses the Israeli election, Iran and other issues. Writing from Amman, prominent Palestinian journalist Daoud Kuttab draws the logical conclusion from Israel's election results that Palestinians must now pursue their own unilateral path and that the world community should no longer feel bound to defend Israel in international institutions. (continued)

Side by Side

Marcia Liss | Posted 03.18.2015 | Comedy
Marcia Liss

...

Kosher Supermarket In Paris Opens Its Doors Two Months After Attacks

Reuters | Posted 03.17.2015 | Religion

(Reuters) - The Paris kosher supermarket where four hostages were killed in January by an Islamist gunman reopened on Sunday morning to "show that lif...

Weekend Roundup: How Japan's Past Shadows Asia's Future

Nathan Gardels | Posted 03.13.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

TOKYO -- Looking out onto Tokyo's towering neon cityscape, it is difficult to imagine the utter devastation of Japan's capital 70 years ago this week in one of the world's greatest overlooked atrocities -- the unsparing American firebombing that incinerated more people than either of the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima or Nagasaki. In this respect, Japan is a long way from its past. But a visit to Tokyo this week by German Chancellor Angela Merkel -- during which she noted how her country had accepted culpability for its WWII fascist aggression in a way that Japan has not -- also highlights how the past still shadows the present -- and the future -- in Asia. (In Europe also the past has returned from another angle as Greece is demanding reparations from Germany). (continued)

Already Yesterday's News? 'The Struggle For Justice is Right Now'

Alana Baum | Posted 03.09.2015 | Politics
Alana Baum

The power of speaking out on behalf of others and against prejudice cannot be overstated or forgotten. It's a lesson already known in our schools. Standing up for the bullied is essential to fighting hate. It must be repeated again and again.

Weekend Roundup: Preparing to Be Disrupted

Nathan Gardels | Posted 03.07.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

This week, The WorldPost conference on "The Future of Work" took place at Lancaster House in London. Discussion around the theme "prepare to be disrupted" ranged from how the emergent sharing economy, along with 3D desktop manufacturing, would take work back into the home to worries that automation could eliminate as much as 47 percent of current jobs in the United States.

Rising Anti-Semitism Challenges Sweden's Proud And Tolerant Self-Image

Religion News Service | Petra Socolovsky | Posted 03.04.2015 | Religion

When a militant extremist stormed into a kosher supermarket in Paris shortly after cartoonists were massacred at the Charlie Hebdo publication, Swedis...

Another Kind of Muslim Brotherhood

Kenan Trebincevic | Posted 03.03.2015 | New York
Kenan Trebincevic

As a 34-year-old Muslim man with an older brother I look up to, I hated how much we had in common with 34-year-old Said Kouachi and his brother Cherif, the terrorists who murdered 12 at the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo.

War and...

Marcia Liss | Posted 03.03.2015 | Comedy
Marcia Liss

...

No Lie!

Marcia Liss | Posted 03.02.2015 | Comedy
Marcia Liss

...

Weekend Roundup: A Sigh of Relief in Europe

Nathan Gardels | Posted 02.27.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

Though nothing is finally settled, Europe this week breathed a sigh of relief. Greece's Syriza-led government backed down in its confrontation with its EU partners over austerity policies and, after bloody skirmishes in the early days of a new cease-fire agreement, the combatants in Ukraine backed off. Not everyone was happy in Greece, though. Manolis Glezos, a 92-year-old WWII Greek resistance hero and prominent member of Syriza, writes that "I apologize to the Greek people for collaborating in this illusion" that the new government would break free of the crushing bailout constraints. Greek journalist Thanos Dimadis argues that standing up to Germany on Greek terms was itself a victory despite compromises. Writing from Kyiv, former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko hopes that "Minsk 2.0" will bring peace, but worries that there is no enforcement mechanism.

Challenge Religious-Based Violence With Education, Unity and True Faith

Raymond Lesniak | Posted 02.26.2015 | Religion
Raymond Lesniak

The powerful force of human desire for revenge, control and power needs to be met by a greater force -- religious leaders from all denominations uniting to speak out on behalf of an individual's right to practice his or her religion without fear or intimidation.

What Harry Potter Taught Me About Antisemitism

Rabbi Evan Moffic | Posted 02.26.2015 | Religion
Rabbi Evan Moffic

Just like some ultra-right wing Orthodox settlers in Israel can impede progress there, so hateful clerics can shape the culture of Arab communities in Europe. The problem is not lack of jobs or social mobility. It is the hijacking of a religion, and we cannot stop it unless we name it.

In the Crosshairs of Terrorism: Will France's Jews Stay or Leave?

Rabbi Abraham Cooper | Posted 02.24.2015 | World
Rabbi Abraham Cooper

Hate is learned and ISIS is but one of its only teachers. That woman's anti-Semitism will not be erased by government decrees. Such hatred can only be deconstructed by Muslims themselves. It is hard to blame any European Jew for not waiting around to find out how this all plays out.

Anti-Semitism and Islamist Fundamentalism in France

Simone Rodan-Benzaquen | Posted 02.24.2015 | World
Simone Rodan-Benzaquen

If we want our children to make the distinction between right and wrong, if we want them to understand and protect themselves from fundamentalist ideology, we need to condemn elected officials who play with fire.

Press Freedom Must Not Be Compromised in Fight Against Extremism

Courtney C. Radsch | Posted 02.23.2015 | Politics
Courtney C. Radsch

There is a valid concern that the countering violent extremism initiative could provide justification for governments to broaden surveillance online and use it to curb human rights and civil liberties.

Weekend Roundup: From Kalashnikovs to God and Computers -- And Back Again

Nathan Gardels | Posted 02.20.2015 | World
Nathan Gardels

Near the end of the Cold War 30 years ago, Régis Debray, the French philosopher and pal of Che Guevara, predicted that the Third World was "bidding its farewell to arms" as the geopolitical conflicts associated with the famous Russian-made Kalashnikov rifle were fading into history. He thought the quest for God, particularly in relation to Islam, would fill the ideological void, and computers would provide a way out of underdevelopment. Debray was both more right and wrong than he knew. As he did not foresee, YouTube and Twitter would become effective propaganda tools for crusading Islamist jihadis and Kalashnikovs would come back in a big way not only as a weapon of choice for theCharlie Hebdo murderers in Paris and the Islamic State in Syria -- but for the separatists in Ukraine as well. History reminds us often enough that what we bid farewell to can return with a vengeance. In a moving tribute to the Christian men beheaded by ISIS in Libya this week, WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones shines a light on their lives through a visit with the families of their Coptic community in Al Aour, Egypt. See her interviews on CNNand MSNBC. (continued)

Not Defending Our Ideals of Freedom Today Would Be a Crime

Inna Shevchenko | Posted 02.20.2015 | World
Inna Shevchenko

I call upon all defenders of freedom to join the ideological battle; now is the time to set pluralism against dogma; drawings, books and peaceful protests against guns; secularism against religious dominance.

Why I Published Cartoons of Muhammad and Don't Regret It

Flemming Rose | Posted 02.19.2015 | World
Flemming Rose

I've been accused of being responsible for the loss of innocent lives and labeled a Nazi who is having Muslims for breakfast.

On Charlie: Courage in the Face of Fear

Frank Fredericks | Posted 02.19.2015 | Religion
Frank Fredericks

So the question is, is it working? Is terrorism having an impact on us? To my disappointment, I think it may be, and for a simple reason: in fear is power.