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Chemotherapy

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 8 in a Series of Cancer-Related Commentary

James Stack | Posted 11.30.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

Like responses to chemo, everyone's experiences are different. Of course, these are my experiences; but I believe they contain universal truths.

Giving My Birthday Away to a Terminally Ill Friend

Laura Collins Lyster-Mensh | Posted 09.23.2013 | Impact
Laura Collins Lyster-Mensh

One of my dearest friends, Charlotte, is dying of cancer. Her doctors are not promising her any more birthdays, so I've decided to give her mine: September 29.

At the Top of My Lungs: About-Face

Jennifer Glass | Posted 11.20.2013 | Healthy Living
Jennifer Glass

The very idea makes me want do an about-face and stop the whole thing. But Tarceva is the best bullet I have to prevent my cancer from spreading, so of course I will put on a brave face, keep calm and carry on. I have skin in this game.

The Contradictions of Cancer

Elise Frame | Posted 11.17.2013 | Healthy Living
Elise Frame

After spending the better part of a year in chemotherapy infusion bays and hospital beds, I finally returned to college to pick up where I left off. But as I've noticed since being back, it isn't quite as simple as that. Cancer's pesky paradoxes seem to follow me around everywhere I turn.

5 Fashion Tips for Cancer Patients (And Others With Chronic Illness)

Anna Leahy | Posted 11.16.2013 | Healthy Living
Anna Leahy

If you're sick, wear what you like. Wear whatever you want to wear, whatever makes you happy or comfortable. Wear something old that brings back memories. Rules don't matter.

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 7 in a Series of Cancer-Related Commentary

James Stack | Posted 11.14.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

When on cycle two, day two, I told my nurse she was joining my angels here on earth, she told me that one of her previous patients had claimed coming into the infusion room was like going to hell -- now I have a Hell's Angel by my side.

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 6 in a Series of Cancer Related-Commentary

James Stack | Posted 11.04.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

Rock me like a wagon wheel... Like tumble weeds, rolling along through the dust and drought. During my Aug. 26 visit to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical C...

At the Top of My Lungs: Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow

Jennifer Glass | Posted 11.03.2013 | Healthy Living
Jennifer Glass

Waiting for each hair to go was like death by a thousand cuts. So on the fifth day of the exodus my husband Harlan got the buzzer and the razor, and I was G.I. Jen. Up to this point I hadn't felt like a sick person. Now I looked in the mirror and saw Cancer Girl.

At the Top of My Lungs: Food for Thought

Jennifer Glass | Posted 10.26.2013 | Healthy Living
Jennifer Glass

In the first weeks of treatment, I had few side effects apart from fatigue. I thought perhaps I had dodged a bullet and would skate through without much discomfort. It would be clear in the coming weeks just what a tough battle this would be, and the best weight for me was my fighting weight.

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 5 in a Series of Cancer-Related Commentary

James Stack | Posted 10.26.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

Looking for adventure... Well, I found it, in a manner of speaking. I felt like a piece of lead on day three after chemo -- sleeping fitfully throug...

At the Top of My Lungs: Ready for Take Off (Chemo Begins)

Jennifer Glass | Posted 10.19.2013 | Healthy Living
Jennifer Glass

I don't care if my hair grows back in 50 shades of gray. I might throw a cap on if my head gets cold, but no precarious headgear for me. Life is too short to worry about your hair blowing away in the wind.

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 4 in a Series of Cancer-Related Commentary

James Stack | Posted 10.16.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

Head on down the highway... The first day of chemo arrived, and I approached it with anxiety, which I suppressed through humor at every opportunity. ...

How a Car Accident and Cancer Taught Me Different Things About Mortality

Dan Duffy | Posted 10.13.2013 | Healthy Living
Dan Duffy

On October 21, 1996, I came literally two inches from dying. I was a 24-year-old male who had just lived through something that should have killed me ten different ways. I knew my reason for being there: I was invincible. I was brash, arrogant, and selfish.

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 3 in a Series of Cancer-Related Commentary

James Stack | Posted 10.10.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

Get your motor running... Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is a little more than an hour's drive from my home in Vermont. During that hour a lot ca...

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 2 in a Series of Cancer-Related Commentary

James Stack | Posted 10.05.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

The results from this study may never benefit me directly, as FDA approvals take forever, but I participated because someone, someday, may be helped due to this small choice I've made.

Unspoken: Cancer's Dehumanizing Late Effect

Benjamin Rubenstein | Posted 10.05.2013 | Healthy Living
Benjamin Rubenstein

They say that sharing one's vulnerabilities begets a sense of closeness in others. For some like A., my illness alone was enough for her to share her biggest fears. For G., hearing my dual cancer tale led to his need to reciprocate with his secret.

Postcards From Lebanon: Part 1 in a Series of Cancer-Related Commentary

James Stack | Posted 09.28.2013 | Healthy Living
James Stack

Come along and listen to... I'm going on a journey and wanted to invite you to join me. I've never been down this road, but it is a trek many have ta...

Chemo Style: A Cancer Patient's Tips for Building a Great Hat Collection

Shelley Nolden | Posted 09.24.2013 | Healthy Living
Shelley Nolden

As any chemo veteran knows, it ain't easy being bald. Some patients can pull off a wig with panache. Others, to my great admiration, go boldly bald. I took the hat approach -- and gave it my all.

Living in the Chemo Ward

Eamonn Conrad | Posted 09.24.2013 | Healthy Living
Eamonn Conrad

I spent the better part of half a year in the chemo ward. It is one of the biggest things that drives me to continue to help people who are there, and keep people from having to go there.

Letting Caregivers Actually Care

Dan Duffy | Posted 09.22.2013 | Healthy Living
Dan Duffy

It is not a strength to be self-sufficient at all times in all circumstances. The people you love are dying to be there for you, and we in turn need to reciprocate that. It's a gift that we can give, and that we owe, to the people who put everything aside just so our lives can be a little more tolerable.

When 'Unremarkable' Is a Good Thing

Myra Demeter | Posted 09.17.2013 | Fifty
Myra Demeter

I am usually perfectly capable of holding a conversation via my Bluetooth connection while driving my car. Almost three years ago, I received a phone call from a close relative that caused me to pull over to the side of the road to give the call my absolute attention.

826 Valencia's Student-Journalists Report on the Science of Freezing Light, Treating Cancer

826 Valencia | Posted 09.17.2013 | San Francisco
826 Valencia

Have you ever thought of freezing light? Normally, light travels 186,282 miles per second, and it seems impossible to catch. In 1999 Professor Lene Vestergaard Hau, a professor of physics at Harvard University, found out how to slow it down.

Buying Pot For My 11-Year-Old

Suzanne Leigh | Posted 09.10.2013 | Parents
Suzanne Leigh

At a retreat for parents of children with brain tumor and neuroblastoma, a group of us discuss alternative treatments. One parent mentions vitamins, another brings up curcumin. I mention our foray into the pot club.

Chemo Brain

Jennifer Giuffre-Donohue | Posted 09.09.2013 | Healthy Living
Jennifer Giuffre-Donohue

If you're going through it, know that you're not alone and if it's causing you distress in your everyday life then talk to your doctor about it. Your brain cells have taken an ass kicking, along with every other cell that was affected by chemo and now you and they just need some TLC.

Cancer Is Not All I Have

Karin Diamond | Posted 09.08.2013 | Healthy Living
Karin Diamond

Sometimes I want to leave it all, unable to handle the weight of my fate staring me in the face. But then good days come, and I forget about the cancer, the chemo, the infertility, so blinded by the gratitude that I get to be here, to do this, to enjoy this world and the people in it.