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Cholera

100 years of Occupation in Haiti

Mark Schuller | Posted 07.28.2015 | World
Mark Schuller

Tuesday marks the 100th anniversary of the commencement of the U.S. Occupation of Haiti. On July 28, 1915, U.S. Marines landed on the shores of Haiti, occupying the country for 19 years. Several have argued that the U.S. has never stopped occupying Haiti, even as military boots left in 1934.

INFOGRAPHIC: How the U.N. is Failing Haitian Cholera Victims

Ted Oswald | Posted 06.07.2015 | Impact
Ted Oswald

Haiti is a few months away from the five-year anniversary of the introduction of cholera because of the United Nations' systematic negligence in leaking contaminated human waste into Haitian waterways.

My Hope for Nepal

Sarina Prabasi | Posted 05.11.2015 | Impact
Sarina Prabasi

In the days since the earthquake, through salty tears and a jolt that has nothing to do with an earthquake, I have realized the depth of my attachment to Nepal. Embarking on my global adventures, I failed to realize until now, how large a part of my heart I had left at home.

What It Will Take To Finally End Cholera In Haiti

Reuters | Posted 05.26.2015 | Impact

By Anastasia Moloney BOGOTA, March 25 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Cholera will continue to kill and infect Haitians as long as they...

UN Cholera Plan for Haiti Must Choose Justice Over Charity

Ted Oswald | Posted 04.28.2015 | Impact
Ted Oswald

Securing water and sanitation infrastructure for Haiti is ultimately about fulfilling obligations and respecting human rights, areas where the UN can, and should, be demonstrating leadership.

Clean Water and Strong Institutions for Haiti

Pedro Medrano Rojas | Posted 03.29.2015 | Impact
Pedro Medrano Rojas

The cholera epidemic in Haiti has highlighted the international community's historic lack of attention to water and sanitation. Water and sanitation coverage in Haiti has stagnated for decades and is the lowest in the Western Hemisphere, far behind the average of other countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Boil the Water

Zeke Stokes | Posted 02.08.2015 | Gay Voices
Zeke Stokes

I grew up in an age in which contracting HIV was tantamount to a death sentence. Thankfully, that's no longer the case. But it's no longer the case so long as someone is tested, diagnosed, and receives a continuum of treatment. In the U.S., we are currently missing the mark by a mile.

Don't Forget Cholera

Pedro Medrano Rojas | Posted 01.19.2015 | Impact
Pedro Medrano Rojas

Both cholera and Ebola have had limited reach when confronting strong public health infrastructure. Lacking these, Haiti and the Ebola-affected countries must respond to outbreaks while keeping site of the future. Ebola is a reminder that the job in Haiti is not done.

Plague Plots - Dispatches from Gabriel García Márquez

Joseph Cooper | Posted 12.30.2014 | Books
Joseph Cooper

Can the accounts and depictions transmitted by Love in the Time of Cholera help us cope with Ebola?

History Proves Travel Bans Are Based On Fear, Not Facts

The Huffington Post | Erin Schumaker | Posted 10.24.2014 | Healthy Living

On October 16, more than 40 members of Congress went on record seeking a travel ban against individuals from Ebola-afflicted West Africa, despite caut...

Young People Use Gorgeous Instagram Pics To Show There's More To Haiti Than Poverty

The Huffington Post | Robbie Couch | Posted 10.24.2014 | Impact

If you ask Paola Mathé, Instagram isn't just for shameless selfies and pics of delicious foods -- it's a great way to change negative perceptions of ...

LOOK: The Toll Of Cholera, in 1832 And In 2010

Posted 10.21.2014 | Healthy Living

By Sonia Shah, Pulitzer Center On Crisis Reporting Ebola may be the latest never-before-seen pathogen spreading out of control in impoverished comm...

A Plea For Help For South Sudan

Keira Knightley | Posted 09.15.2014 | Impact
Keira Knightley

You hear these stories all the time in Africa -- the brutality, the never-ending death and starvation. It's easy to become immune. And then you meet someone like Rebecca. She says she misses the way her husband made her laugh; she misses the way he held her and you think -- you're just like me. That's what I'd say about my husband. She says she can't think about him now because her heart will break, and she has to keep going for her children.

After the Earthquake: Cholera in Haiti and How You Can Help

Jonathan Jacob Moore | Posted 08.12.2014 | Impact
Jonathan Jacob Moore

Access to clean water is essential to the prevention and treatment of cholera, in order to prevent the ingestion of waterborne bacteria and the contamination of food due to preparation with unsanitary water.

Contagion: The Costs of Global Panic

Lyric Hughes Hale | Posted 07.29.2014 | World
Lyric Hughes Hale

Physician, do no harm. The same caution should be applied to philanthropists, public officials, and other well-meaning agents of globalization. In the realm of health care, quite ironically avoiding one risk could actually lead to a worse outcome overall.

In the Time of Cholera

Adam C. Levine | Posted 05.24.2014 | Impact
Adam C. Levine

Like a host of other diseases that only strike poor people living in poor countries, cholera is not something that people born and raised in wealthy countries spend much time thinking about.

Film Fatal Assistance Spotlights Colossal Aid Failure in Haiti

Georgianne Nienaber | Posted 05.06.2014 | Entertainment
Georgianne Nienaber

Fatal Assistance ably demonstrates the folly and damage caused by swarms of NGO's and Hollywood do-gooders that completely ignored the root causes of Haiti's problems pre and post earthquake.

OAS Insider Details Proposed Coup Against Haiti's Preval and Cholera's 'Genocide by Negligence'

Georgianne Nienaber | Posted 04.26.2014 | Books
Georgianne Nienaber

This book details Seitenfus's dependence upon his own moral compass as he was forced to take a stand against powerful international players, including the United States, as the potential coup was put in motion.

Futility in a Blue Helmet

Rebecca Tinsley | Posted 01.26.2014 | World
Rebecca Tinsley

The UN must support its own soldiers in Central African Republic and the existing force in Darfur when they try to do their job. Otherwise, why do we bother to extend this false hope to civilians facing ethnic cleansing? The answer, of course, is that sending Blue Helmets makes us feel better.

Mexican Cholera Outbreak Spreads To 159 Confirmed Cases

Reuters | Posted 01.23.2014 | Healthy Living

MEXICO CITY, Oct 14 (Reuters) - A cholera outbreak in central Mexico has risen to 159 confirmed cases and spread to four states as well as the capit...

Ubiquitous Plastics, Toxic Sponges Extraordinaire

Dr. Reese Halter | Posted 05.13.2014 | Green
Dr. Reese Halter

Toxic plastic pollution is filling-up the Great Lakes, European lakes and even subalpine lakes in Europe's famed Alps. This insidious byproduct of pet...

A Haitian Solution for Public Infrastructure to Eliminate Diarrheal Disease

Alan Ricks | Posted 01.23.2014 | Impact
Alan Ricks

It is undeniable that Haiti needs -- and deserves -- a functional and dignified solution that provides the major tools to combat diarrheal disease -- clean water, primary healthcare, and clean waste. This is not a Haitian problem: It is a global one.

93 People Affected By Cholera

AP | Posted 08.30.2013 | Latino Voices

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic -- Authorities in the Dominican Republic are checking the water in a city in the south of the Caribbean country afte...

Do As We Say, Not As We Do: The Haitian Cholera Epidemic and the Moral Legitimacy of the United Nations

Beatrice Lindstrom | Posted 10.19.2013 | World
Beatrice Lindstrom

Cholera, a water-borne disease that can kill in a matter of hours, was introduced into Haiti via untreated human waste that leaked from a UN peacekeeping base into the river that serves as the water source for tens of thousands of Haitians.

Arms Race -- Getting Ahead of Killer Microbes

Tom Frieden, MD, MPH | Posted 07.30.2013 | Science
Tom Frieden, MD, MPH

The basic tools of disease tracking and data analysis -- which CDC's disease detectives and others relied on to eradicate smallpox, identify Legionnaires' disease, and stop SARS -- remain essential. But they are no longer enough.