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Innovation in China: Promise or Pipedream?

Tom Doctoroff | Posted 10.17.2015 | Business
Tom Doctoroff

If China fails to turbocharge its capacity to innovate, the country will experience a hard economic landing and social stability will be threatened. But can China evolve into an innovation powerhouse? The jury is out.

China and the Philippines: Asia's Most Toxic Relationship

Richard Javad Heydarian | Posted 08.17.2015 | World
Richard Javad Heydarian

Unless China dramatically scales back its para-military patrols, military exercises, and construction activities across disputed waters, any Filipino leader will undoubtedly face an uphill battle, if not domestic backlash, in exploring a more pragmatic relationship with Beijing.

China's Post '90s Generation: New Minds, Old World

Tom Doctoroff | Posted 08.11.2015 | Business
Tom Doctoroff

Twenty years ago, China's engagement with the world had barely begun. The Internet was accessible to only the privileged few. Parents still espoused "protective" values reinforced by their experiences during the instability of two man-made disasters.

Justice Kennedy and Confucianism

Akshan deAlwis | Posted 06.29.2015 | Politics
Akshan deAlwis

The United States Supreme Court has traditionally been a staunch opponent of international theory. It doesn't help that there's also a strident political opposition to using foreign norms in American law.

Women's Delegation to Cross the DMZ

John Feffer | Posted 06.22.2015 | World
John Feffer

We need symbolic acts that capture the world's attention and help shift all the major players in the direction of negotiations.

The Deeper Human Conflict Revealed by "Je Suis Charlie"

Joseph W. Gauld | Posted 03.22.2015 | World
Joseph W. Gauld

No matter how deeply Muslims and Catholics have been hurt, we should be reassured that most have the character to accept this as the cost of respecting individual rights.

The Chinese Dream: A New Interpretation

Mahlon Meyer | Posted 02.07.2015 | Politics
Mahlon Meyer

Like most Chinese fathers, Y.P. Chan thought he had his children's education all figured out. After all, Chan was educated not only in traditional Chinese philosophy but had also excelled in the worlds of engineering, business and high-stakes finance.

Xi Launches Cultural Counter-Revolution To Restore Confucianism As China's Ideology

Nathan Gardels | Posted 12.18.2014 | World
Nathan Gardels

Clearly, The Analects of Confucius is for Xi's Chinese renaissance what The Little Red Book was for Mao's Cultural Revolution.

In Celebration of the Karaoke, Vietnamese Style

Andrew Lam | Posted 11.23.2014 | Healthy Living
Andrew Lam

Below is an excerpt from my book, East Eats West: Writing in Two Hemispheres, published in 2010. Sadness and joy and yearnings and stories of broken h...

Matt Sheehan

Why Christ, Mao And The Buddha Are Making A Comeback In China | Matt Sheehan | Posted 08.07.2014 | World

BEIJING -- The dominant political narrative in China today is one of resounding triumph: targets for economic growth achieved, rival countries overtak...

Seeking a Spiritual Home

Katherine Towler | Posted 09.17.2014 | Religion
Katherine Towler

In our restless, striving American culture, in an age of radical change and redefinition, the very concept of home is under assault. In so many ways, we are spiritually homeless.

Beijing's Streets: Anything but Pedestrian

Ella Genasci Smith | Posted 09.14.2014 | College
Ella Genasci Smith

Like elsewhere in Chinese life, pedestrians have accepted their place on Beijing's streets. They've embraced patience. I, on the other hand, find myself regularly glaring at unsuspecting drivers, unaffected, as they wiz past me, tires barely missing my toes.

Book Review: Trying Not to Try

David Vognar | Posted 06.15.2014 | Books
David Vognar

In his new book Trying Not to Try, the University of British Columbia Asian Studies and Embodied Cognition professor Edward Slingerland treats us to a work of seminal importance.

True Lessons of East Asian Education

Jung-kyu Kim | Posted 05.11.2014 | Education
Jung-kyu Kim

Having studied in both Korea and the U.S., we do not find much to admire about the Korean education system. For all its faults, the "liberal" American system cultivates initiative and ingenuity like no other, a fact which might explain why the U.S. still leads the world in technological and cultural innovation.

The Passing of the Old Year: Confucian Thoughts

Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D. | Posted 03.15.2014 | Religion
Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D.

With each day, the sun warms our bodies and our hearts with a few more minutes of light as we move slowly toward Vernal Equinox and spring. Each religious tradition has expressed thoughts about this transition in our year and thus in our lives, both physical and spiritual.

Singapore's Lesson For Washington: Morality Of Leaders Matters

Jung-kyu Kim | Posted 12.22.2013 | Religion
Jung-kyu Kim

The lesson of Singapore, for America and the rest of the world, is this: no other government takes people development more seriously.

Cherish That Guilt. It Means You Are Still Human

Jung-kyu Kim | Posted 01.23.2014 | Impact
Jung-kyu Kim

My conclusion is a simple one: to restore morality to our businesses we must start by recovering our ability to feel, namely ren. As Jonah Lehrer, a writer on psychology, points out, the worst criminal is not someone who lacks moral reasoning but someone who feels unmoved by others' suffering -- the very definition of a psychopath.

Thoughts on Karma...

Megan Staggs | Posted 12.04.2013 | Healthy Living
Megan Staggs

We cannot control the impact of our thoughts, words and actions, but we can be aware of our intentions behind them.

Why Confucius Rejected 'Laissez-faire'

Jung-kyu Kim | Posted 01.23.2014 | Religion
Jung-kyu Kim

Why did Lao Tzu prefer laissez-faire to paternalism? For much the same reason that neoclassical economists advocate free-market capitalism: good intention distorts.

'Peony Pavilion,' the Romeo and Juliet of the East

Andrew Lam | Posted 11.24.2013 | Entertainment
Andrew Lam

What you should know first and foremost about The Peony Pavilion, a 16th-century Chinese musical drama about love, death, and resurrection -- and arguably the most famous of all Kunqu Operas -- is that its poetry can kill. It has killed before.

Reversing The Culture Of Greed

Jung-kyu Kim | Posted 11.24.2013 | Religion
Jung-kyu Kim

A culture of extreme individualism and profit-seeking has frayed our social fabric. To reverse the decline, we must discard the notion that greed is good.

The Confucian in the World: Neither Rustic Nor Pedant

Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D. | Posted 10.09.2013 | Religion
Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D.

It is easy to understand Confucius' critique of too much raw nature. As he responded to the political chaos of the period in which he lived by suggesting the necessity of a return to the teachings of the ancient sages through learning, he also faced an opponent in those who sought to simply escape the turmoil of the age.

Partisanship: A Confucian Perspective

Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D. | Posted 08.10.2013 | Religion
Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D.

Never a day passes, it seems, without some new level of partisanship as front-page news. Its effects, as we all know, are nothing short of derailing the very capacity of the government to carry out its most fundamental responsibilities.

Who Will Light Incense When Mother's Gone?

Andrew Lam | Posted 07.11.2013 | Women
Andrew Lam

This morning, it occurs to me as I type these words that this too, strangely enough, is a kind of ritual, a kind of filial impulse to reconcile Mother's world and my own. The solemnity of the act -- my fingers gliding on the keyboard, my mind on things ethereal -- is something akin, at last, to my mother's morning prayers.

Confucian Thoughts On Aging

Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D. | Posted 07.09.2013 | Religion
Rodney L. Taylor, Ph.D.

The Master said, "The filial piety of nowadays means the support of one's parents. But dogs and horses are able to do something in the way of support; without reverence, what is there is distinguish the one support given from the other?"