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Crime Fiction

Jumping Into Self-Publishing: An Author's Perspective

Nick Kolakowski | Posted 08.29.2016 | Home
Nick Kolakowski

I'm what you'd call a midlist author: every couple years, I publish a book that does reasonably well. I haven't been to the top of the bestseller lists, but (he said dryly) my books have ended up on the front cover of a couple prominent remainder catalogs. I earn royalties and advances, but I also have a day job.

Why I'm Not Giving In To "Surrender, New York"

Lev Raphael | Posted 08.24.2016 | Home
Lev Raphael

It's been a long time since I read The Alienist, which I found absorbing and beautifully written, so I was intrigued to see a review of his latest boo...

Love, Drugs and Crime in America's Heartland

Seth Ferranti | Posted 08.05.2016 | Home
Seth Ferranti

In his debut novel, The More They Disappear, Donaldson writes a tale that seems stolen from our national headlines. He tackles the Oxycontin crisis and looks back at how it started in the mid-90s. The More They Disappear takes us to the front lines of the battle against small-town drug abuse in an unnerving tale of addiction, loss, and the battle to overcome the darkest parts of ourselves.

Genre Snobs Are Everywhere

Lev Raphael | Posted 06.27.2016 | Home
Lev Raphael

The contempt these mystery readers sometimes feel directed at them gets recycled as they express disdain for books they don't like which have been written and enjoyed by people they have to denigrate. That's not an argument or even a defense: it's blatant insecurity.

'Wilde Lake,' A Conversation with Laura Lippman

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 06.13.2016 | Home
Mark Rubinstein

Laura Lippman began writing novels while working as a reporter. Seven "Tess Monaghan" books were published before she left journalism in 2001.

'The Drifter,' A Conversation with Nicholas Petrie

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 01.14.2017 | Home
Mark Rubinstein

Nicholas Petrie received his MFA in fiction from the University of Washington. While an undergraduate and the University of Michigan, he won a Hopwood Award for short fiction. His story, "At the Laundromat," won the 2006 Short Story Contest in the Seattle Review. The Drifter is his debut novel.

What Makes Academic Crime Fiction Tick?

Lev Raphael | Posted 10.13.2016 | Education
Lev Raphael

I served my time in academia for over a decade. And a few years after I left, I decided to start a mystery series set in that environment.

Shooting for the Stars, Belsky's Newest Page Turning Thriller

Holly Cara Price | Posted 09.03.2016 | Home
Holly Cara Price

The Kennedy Connection was a cleverly written, suspenseful page turner in the best sense and Shooting for the Stars is its' worthy successor. In this saga, Malloy is thrown into the sleazy, headline-grabbing world of a prime-time TV newsmagazine when he joins forces with a beautiful reporter who has uncovered answers long buried that lead to the solving of a cold case from decades before.

Dan Smith's The Darkest Heart: A Fresh Take On Crime Thrillers

Steven Petite | Posted 08.24.2016 | Home
Steven Petite

From Sierra Leone to Sumatra to Spain and the Soviet Union, Smith has seen it all, but his time spent living in central and northern Brazil gave him the tools to pen The Darkest Heart.

Brian Panowich's Glorious Bull Mountain Pays Homage to Southern Noir

Steven Petite | Posted 07.28.2016 | Home
Steven Petite

Bull Mountain is an emphatic win for the somewhat niche genre of Southern Noir, spliced with the poignancy of literary fiction that comes together to create one of the best multi-generational family sagas in years.

What Is the Appeal of Detective Fiction? Dashiell Hammett's "The Continental Op" as Exemplar

Anis Shivani | Posted 06.26.2016 | Home
Anis Shivani

The first-person narrator is the imposer of order in a world of chaos--or rather, deceit, lies, hypocrisy, where nothing is as it seems. And yet reading a classic of noir fiction like Dashiell Hammett's The Continental Op is a revelation.

'World Gone By': A Conversation With Dennis Lehane

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 05.19.2015 | Home
Mark Rubinstein

Dennis Lehane is known to millions of readers. His novels Mystic River, Gone, Baby, Gone, and Shutter Island became blockbuster movies, with the most recent film being The Drop, which is based on his short story, Animal Rescue.

'Phantom Limb': A Conversation With Dennis Palumbo

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 05.12.2015 | Home
Mark Rubinstein

Dennis Palumbo is a thriller writer and psychotherapist in private practice. He's the author of the non-fiction book, Writing from the Inside Out and a collection of mystery stories, From Crime to Crime.

Remembering P.D. James: When Crime Comes Calling, Good Luck Ignoring Its Knock

Christina Larmer | Posted 01.31.2015 | Home
Christina Larmer

With the recent death of the doyenne of crime fiction P.D. James at age 94, I am reminded of a wondrous quote she made in 2011 that put my life and work into perspective. "I don't think that we necessarily choose our genre; the genre chooses us."

The Bad Review (Of My Own Book) That Made Me Laugh

Lev Raphael | Posted 11.10.2014 | Home
Lev Raphael

This nimrod didn't compare my adult thriller to any other book in my Nick Hoffman mystery series, but wholly inappropriately compared it to a children's self-help book. And reached a conclusion 100% at odds with what actually happens in the novel and what it means.

Is Crime Fiction Guilty Of Targeting Women?

Åsa Larsson | Posted 10.12.2014 | Home
Åsa Larsson

Why? I honestly think these are interesting questions. Why are women so disproportionately the victims of crime fiction's violent crimes? Why do I kill so many dogs?

A Talk With Peter James and Ian Rankin

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 09.13.2014 | Home
Mark Rubinstein

Internationally acclaimed, their books have been translated into dozens of languages, and are regularly on best-seller lists. Peter and Ian are being interviewed together since they collaborated on a story in Face Off, a collection of short stories by some of the world's greatest thriller writers.

Five Reasons Why Progressives Should Read Crime Fiction

Kenneth Wishnia | Posted 09.19.2014 | Home
Kenneth Wishnia

Let's face it: some of the most ideologically committed people rarely read fiction, even socially conscious fiction, which means they're only getting part of the story.

Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe -- Meet Jake Lassiter

Paul Levine | Posted 11.30.2013 | Home
Paul Levine

Funny thing is, just as with Spenser and Travis McGee, Jake never seemed that hard-boiled to me. Oh, there's the occasional tough-guy line: "They don't call us sharks for our ability to swim."

Bombshell Explodes From the First Page

Allison Leotta | Posted 09.22.2013 | Home
Allison Leotta

As a prosecutor turned novelist, I'm picky about the crime fiction I read -- which is why Catherine Coulter is one of my favorite authors.

A Talk with Scott Pratt

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 08.26.2013 | Home
Mark Rubinstein

I told my wife, "I think I'm not going to practice law anymore. She said, "Are you crazy?" I said "If this is the way they treat their own, I don't want to be a part of that anymore. She asked what I was going to do, and I showed her The Lincoln Lawyer. I said, "I can do this..."

A Much Loved and Complex Kingpin

Mark Rubinstein | Posted 08.20.2013 | TV
Mark Rubinstein

We crave real portrayals of people like ourselves: people who can be confused, get angry, celebrate joyous moments and sometimes feel rejected and unloved. James Gandolfini made Tony Soprano, the Jersey mob boss, one of us.

Guess Who's Coming To Dinner? America's Worst Serial Killer

Roger Marsh | Posted 04.29.2013 | Weird News
Roger Marsh

Herman is actually a good suspect for pulling off the Jack the Ripper crimes where his availability was there and he was a top practitioner of the advanced techniques used on the victims' bodies.

Is Most Contemporary Literary Fiction Really Terrible?

Lev Raphael | Posted 06.01.2013 | Home
Lev Raphael

I hear this complaint a lot, and it's just been repeated on Salon.com. Is it true?

Sometimes We Root for the Crooks

Lev Raphael | Posted 03.24.2013 | Home
Lev Raphael

This rough justice often carries readers and viewers along to cheer for the law breakers. Maybe they enact our taboo impulses, maybe not. But there's something deeply satisfying in watching characters you like cross the line and work out their own form of justice.