iOS app Android app

Criminal Record

Denying People A Job After They've Left Prison Is Unconstitutional, Court Rules

The Huffington Post | Cristian Farias | Posted 01.04.2016 | Politics

A court in Pennsylvania on Wednesday struck down a state law that imposed a lifetime ban from employment on as many as 200,000 people with criminal r...

Christopher Mathias

New York City Council Bans Felony Conviction Box On Job Applications

HuffingtonPost.com | Christopher Mathias | Posted 06.11.2015 | Politics

NEW YORK -- Carl Stubbs, 63, stood outside New York City Council chambers Wednesday in anticipation of the council’s vote on the Fair Chance Act -- ...

High Hurdle to College for Ex-Offenders

WNYC | Posted 05.11.2015 | New York
WNYC

But advocates say such incidents are an exception and most people who have run-ins with the criminal justice system don't go to college to commit crime. Elected officials are starting to pay attention to that argument.

A Criminal Record May No Longer Be A Stumbling Block To Employment In Some Places

Pew's Stateline | Jeffrey Stinson | Posted 05.22.2014 | Politics

This piece comes to us courtesy of Stateline. Stateline is a nonpartisan, nonprofit news service of the Pew Charitable Trusts that provides daily repo...

New Laws Aim To Help People Get Jobs After Getting Arrested

Youth Radio -- Youth Media International | Posted 06.11.2013 | Business
Youth Radio -- Youth Media International

Photo Credit: Brett Myers/Youth Radio By: Ashley Williams Seventeen year-old Andrew is filling out a job application for a Jamba Juice in Oakland, C...

Should a Criminal Record Be A Deterrent to Hiring?

Josh Tolan | Posted 12.12.2012 | Business
Josh Tolan

Employers are looking for talent with the right skills to fill open positions and bring value to their company. We all make mistakes and a candidate's actions in the past shouldn't hold them back from achieving success in the future.

Bloomberg's Reefer Madness Costs $75 Million a Year

Jesse Levine | Posted 05.25.2011 | New York
Jesse Levine

Since 1996 New York City has spent from half a billion to over a billion dollars arresting people for less than an ounce of marijuana.